• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout






Dave's Fiery Front Page

Exploring the World of Spice and Smoke
Tags >> other recommended sites

 

Rick Browne, Ph.B takes a look at Australia’s love affair with barbecue in “Baang-gaa to Barbies: Australia’s Barbecue Heritage,” excerpted from the May/June issue of Burn! Magazine.

 Group BBQ on a beach Down UnderLet me smash a common misconception about Australian barbecue: Down Under, they cook prawns —no one here “slips another shrimp on the Barbie.”

In fact, cooking shrimp, er, prawns on a barbecue was never all that popular. At least, not until a certain macho, crocodile-wrestlin’ movie star uttered the quote in a 1980s ad campaign to get Yanks to go Oz (that’s Australia, for those of you who can’t keep up).

Aussie barbecues back then usually consisted of “mystery bags,” or “snags” of various sorts—that’s sausages to you and me—which were cooked up on flat grills or hot plates. “Don’t fork the snags,” was the warning heard most often, as an inexperienced griller might puncture the snag with his or her fork and let all the juices leak out.

Like their U.S. counterparts, Aussies today are much more sophisticated when it comes to grilling. Today’s barbecue menu might feature such exotic fare as Malaysian spotted prawns marinated in Chinese hoisin and Japanese sake, dusted with lemon myrtle and drizzled with a honey-onion-macadamia nut sauce.

Aussies use their barbecue grills much more often than we Americans do. In fact, we’re third on the list of the world’s most avid barbecuers, after Australia and South Africa. Even the government participates by mandating free gas or electric barbecues in parks, beaches, and campsites. And if you come across the rare Barbie that’s not free, the twenty cents to operate is still a deal.

When it comes to backyard grilling, Australians prefer faster-cooking, uncovered flattop gas grills, as opposed to slower-cooking, covered charcoal grills. Recent legislation banning backyard fires in and around major cities has boosted the use of gas barbies, especially as devastating bush fires become more and more common.

Even boaters and yachtsmen take part in the barbecue craze, mounting stainless steel propane barbies on the aft decks of their vessels. Three-quarters of the yachts we saw on an afternoon cruise had barbecues mounted on the stern rails.

And when we consider Aussie barbie, let’s not forget that the native aboriginals where here first, about 40,000 years before the British Empire landed a boat full of convicts on the continent’s shores. In that time, the aborigines perfected “bush tucker”—the fruits, vegetables, and game harvested in the wild—and the best methods with which to cook it. That’s right, barbecue.

Read the full article, as well as Rick’s recommendations for the best restaurants Down Under in the May/June issue of Burn! Magazine, out now.


Charleston Pepper SunIn an article posted on The Atlantic’s website last week, Gary Paul Nabhan, co-author of Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail, addressed the relationship between farming in the Southwest and climate change—both food production and food security have been cast into question with the growing scarcity of water and unpredictable growing seasons and weather patterns, such as drought.

Nabhan points out that with water capacity near its limit for cities and rural agricultural areas, “food security in the Southwest depends upon the security of water supplies being delivered to irrigable land. That capacity, we can now see, has been severely impaired by urban growth in the Sunbelt since World War II, and is likely to be further impacted by the vagaries of weather shifts.”

The burden of addressing such trends, says Nabhan, falls on both the consumer and farmer, and while individual responses may not be enough to reverse the trends. Sustainable agriculture and good farming practices may be the best way to counter the growing threat of food security in the region.

In Chasing Chiles, Nabhan, along with co-authors Kurt Michael Friese and Kraig Kraft, set out to discover the history and potential of America’s heirloom chile varieties. Their journey reveals the chile pepper’s dynamic role in understanding climate change and the future of food production.

So how can food producers and eaters in the Southwest improve their “foodprints?”

“Eat and farm as if the earth matters, as we should have been doing all along,” says Nabhan in Chasing Chiles. “Regardless of how quickly we can implement the specific fixes proposed to mitigate climate change, we all need to reduce our carbon [footprint] and adapt to change in ways that keep the earth’s bounty as diverse, as delicious, and as resilient as possible.”

As an orchard keeper and chile grower, Nabhan has committed to do his share to curve the growing trend of climate change by conserving water between rainfalls, growing regional-appropriate crops, such as drought and heat-tolerant heirlooms, and soil-building.

For the rest of us, Nabhan, Friese, and Kraft have these suggestions in Chasing Chiles:

  1. Explore, celebrate, and consume what diversity can be found locally.
  2. Farmers’ knowledge and problem-solving skills are assets for coping with and adapting to climate change.
  3. Eaters (chefs and consumers) need to vote with their forks, wallets, and ballots in support of more diverse and regionally self-sufficient food systems.
  4. Climate change is best dealt with as one of many compounding factors, not as an environmental impact apart from all others.
  5. Empower local food communities to be “co-designers” of local solutions to global change, and then to creatively transmit their solutions to other communities.

If nothing else, says Nabhan, “I get down on my knees and put my hands into the earth.”

Read more about the history of chiles in America, and their tenuous relationship with biodiversity and climate change in Chasing Chiles, available at Amazon. Click here to read the full article from The Atlantic.


Sources:

“Farming in the Time of Climate Catastrophe,” by Gary Paul Nabhan, www.TheAtlantic.com

Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail, by Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft & Gary Paul Nabhan, © 2011 Chelsea Green Publishing


From the Burn! Magazine Blog...

Andalusian Paella

March 27th is national Paella day, and if you’ve never had a chance to try this famous Spanish dish, it’s the perfect time. Paella is perhaps one of Spain’s best-known dishes, originating in the Valencia region, and is one of the national dishes of Spain.

In its most traditional form—called paella Valenciana, it is made up of rice, green vegetables, some kind of meat, snails, beans, and spices—including saffron and garlic. Other varieties include seafood paella, in which seafood is substituted for the meat and snails of the Valencia recipe, or mixed paella, which contains both meat and seafood.

True paella Valenciana is a treat for any fan of Spain’s gamey, earthy dishes, but if the thought of snails in your paella sounds a little too traditional, we suggest this mixed paella recipe from One Tribe Gourmet.com.

Andalusian Mixed Paella

1 ripe tomato
1/2 cup white wine
1 red onion, chopped
12 black mussels, beards removed & scrubbed
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 red onion, extra, finely chopped
2 pieces Italian sausage, cook ahead & sliced
2 wood roasted paquillo peppers, chopped
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup sivaris bomba paella rice
1/2 teaspoon Spansih saffron threads
2 cups organic chicken stock, heated
1/2 cup frozen peas
12 extra large shrimp, unpeeled
12 little neck clams
1 handful parsley, chopped
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
1/2 teaspoon Spanish pimenton smoked paprika

Heat the wine and onions in a saucepan over high heat. Add the mussels, cover for five minutes. Remove from the heat, discard any unopened mussels, and drain, reserving the liquid to use later in the recipe. Heat the oil in a large, heavy bottomed paella pan, add the extra onion, Italian sausage (sliced) cook for five minutes, or until softened. Add the chopped tomatoes, paquillo peppers, pimenton smoky paprika, & cayenne pepper. Season with sea salt & freshly ground black pepper. Stir in the reserved (wine/mussels) liquid, then add the rice and stir again. Blend the saffron with the stock and stir into the rice mixture. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes without stirring. Put the peas, shrimp, clams on top of the rice. Push them into the rice, cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes, turning over halfway through, until the rice is cooked. Add the mussels & lemon juice for the last 5 minutes to heat through. If the rice is not cooked, add extra stock and cook for a few more minutes. Leave to rest for 5 minutes, then add the parsley.

Serves 4
Heat level: Medium

Find more great recipes and articles on the Burn! Magazine blog at www.burn-magazine.com!


Dave DeWittHot spot EatMoreHeat.com is using the wave of the future to broadcast the Fiery Foods Show LIVE! Check out their Stickam live broadcast of the show floor, and tune in for interviews with exhibitors, their products, and other special guests. The show starts this morning at 10 AM with Pope of Peppers Dave DeWitt – don’t miss it! During the live broadcast, they’ll also be giving away free one-year subscriptions to Burn! Magazine. The winners will be selected by each segment guest and will be awarded to the viewer that asks the best question during their segment. If you’d like to submit a question, register for a free account at Stickam.

AND THIS JUST IN: Saturday's live feed brought in 20,000 viewers! Check out what it's all about here, or learn more about today's schedule from Eat More Heat!


Scorpions with a ScorpionBy now you've undoubtedly heard about the ongoing competition for the hottest chile in the world award.  Whether it's 'Bhut Jolokia', 'Trinidad Scorpion', 'Fatalii', or others, there are two trustworthy locations for bedding plants and seeds.  Cross Country Nurseries has more than 500 varieties of chile bedding plants, including many of the superhot varieties.  Jim Duffy of Refining Fire Chiles has a store with the largest collection anywhere of superhot chile seeds.

 

Specifically, Scorpion bedding plants are available from ChilePlants.com, here.  Seeds are available in the Store at Refining Fire Chiles, here.


The Pepper EaterSometimes it’s easy to forget that producing fiery foods is more than just a passion – in many parts of the world, chile production and processing is a necessity. Dried red pepper is the one of the most widely consumed spices in the world, eaten daily by one-quarter of the world’s population. Chile peppers are one of the oldest domesticated crops. Civilizations in South America grew chile peppers for food and medicinal purposes, and after peppers were introduced to other parts of the globe more than 500 years ago, chiles became important in developing nations for their economic value. Ethiopia alone consumes 466 million kilograms of pepper annually, with an estimated 400,000 women in Ethiopia processing peppers for income.Women Processing Peppers

Inspired by stories of Ethiopian women bringing in income by processing peppers by hand, a team from the Hassno Plattner Design Institute at Stanford University developed the Pepper Eater—an affordable hand-cranked pepper grinder. Pepper processing is exhausting work that turns fresh peppers into higher-value products: dried flakes, seeds, and powder. The procedure can cause severe irritation in the skin, eyes, and noses from exposure to pepper oil containing capsaicin, pepper dust in the air can cause respiratory issues. The Pepper Eater produces dried pepper flakes about 2-4 times faster than current manual methods while greatly reducing the health risks associated with processing chiles.

The design team included Samuel Hamner, Megan Kerins, Siobhan Nolan, and Scott Sadlon, a group of Stanford Engineering and Business grad students. After successfully conducting an on-the-ground feasibility study in September 2009, Sam and Scott are continuing as an independent design and strategy team with the goal of implementing the Pepper Eater in Ethiopia and other developing markets. Most recently, they have partnered with Compatible Technology International and have been featured in National Geographic Magazine to help them achieve their goal and gain exposure for the project.

Interested in learning more about the project, or donating? Visit: www.thepeppereater.org.

Sources & images for this article provided by:

www.thepeppereater.org

http://socialelab.org/?page_id=103


Altoids BBQ
Mini BBQ from Instructables

You don’t have to be a kid to appreciate something as cool as a BBQ grill made out of an Altoids container. The model pictured is just one of many DIY designs that have been featured all over the Web. This grill is made using an Altoids Sours tin,  some sheet metal screws, metal nuts, and a couple of computer fan guards. Once constructed, place a briquette on the lower rack and light it from the bottom.  (Other grills have been made using gas and rectangular Altoids tins, too.) The grill heats up quite a bit, and it really can cook mini hamburgers or a full-size hot dog cut into segments. It may not be completely practical, but it sure works as a conversation starter at your next BBQ!

Try your hand at making a mini BBQ grill – check out the Instructables website for an easy-to-follow tutorial.


ThrowdownRippin’ Red Wing Sauce, the newest product from Rizzotti Foods, LLC will be going head to head with the one and only DEFCON Sauces! The gauntlet was thrown in a thread on peppersandmore.com in August, and both Rippin’ Red Wing Sauce and DEFCON have accepted the challenge.

“It is an honor and pleasure to challenge the mighty DEFCON sauces. We have nothing but respect and admiration for John Dilley and his products,” said Rizotti Foods owner John Rizzotti.Rippin Red Hot Wing Sauce

Hosted by Peppers and More, the contest will feature a blind taste test using tasters who have never tried either of the two sauces. The sauces will be judged on a list of four criteria, rating the food with a 1 to 5 number system, 5 being the best:

  1. How well does the sauce cling/stick to wings? 1-2-3-4-5
  2. Aroma? 1-2-3-4-5
  3. Color of sauce 1-2-3-4-5
  4. Overall taste? 1-2-3-4-5Defcon Sauces

To find out more about the Throwdown, visit www.scottrobertsweb.com, or read the original thread on www.peppersandmore.com!

Learn more about the challengers: DEFCON Sauces and Rippin' Red Wing Sauces.


 

Check out the Events Calendar at the bottom of the Fiery Foods & BBQ homepage for fiery events taking place across the country. Use our handy events list to satisfy your craving for all things spicy! Here's a tasty sampling for the weekend of August 21-22:

• Mammoth Festival - Wine, Music, Food & Art, August 20 - August 22 in Mammoth Lakes, CA

• Diamond State BBQ Championship, Saturday, August 21 in Dover, DE
• Salsa Showdown, Saturday, August 21 in Holland, MI
• Taste of Los Alamos Fundraiser, Saturday, August 21 in Los Alamos, NM

Click here to see all upcoming events. Have an event to add to the menu? Contact us at fiery-foods@comcast.net.


 

Cookstr logo

I am pleased to be Author of the Day on Cookstr on January 10. It's nice to get a little recognition every now and then! Katie Workman, the editor-in-chief of the site, describes it this way: "Cookstr.com is a new cooking site dedicated to providing our users with great recipes from the best chefs and cookbook authors. It’s still early days for us, and we’re adding more chefs and authors – and more recipes – all the time. We’ll also be adding new features over the next few months. But in the meantime we’re excited to share with you thousands of recipes from cookbooks you know and love, and help you discover wonderful new books and cooks."  I just did a search in their recipe section for "chile pepper" and found 275 recipes, so they're doing an excellent job in our field of interest. "Barbecue" yielded 107 recipes.

 



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.

is there such a thing as generic viagra, xanax overnight shipping, cheapest cialis prescription