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Heat Level - 2
"Legume" may be the general term for beans, but this stew is a hearty mix of marinated beef and vegetables. All the ingredients can be found at any supermarket, but the combination of habanero chiles, thyme and allspice gives this dish the exotic flavor of the Caribbean. Serve it over mounds of rice or with hunks of crusty bread to mop up the spiced broth. Note: this recipe requires advance preparation.
Since capsaicin breaks up nasal congestion and gives us the "salsa sniffles," try this quick chicken soup cure for your next cold.

Peaches are the leading deciduous fruit crop grown in Texas and it is estimated that there are more than one million trees planted statewide. Average annual production exceeds one million bushels.  Some of the best peaches I’ve ever eaten are grown in the Hill Country outside of Austin and San Antonio.  They are so important there that a Hill Country Fruit Council has been established to guide tourists to the best orchards.  Here’s how to use them in a wonderful dessert. From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

Even people who don’t like artichokes will like this dish. Although it tastes like it requires a lot of preparation, it is very easy to make. It takes no time to put together and can be made in advance and refrigerated to save time before a party. Then it just needs to be brought to room temperature before baking. Serve with the pita triangles or substitute crisp tortilla or corn chips; they all taste good with this dip. To increase the heat, sprinkle minced jalapeño or serrano chiles on top.

Andy Householder, the Owner of Hi-Co Western Products prescribes the following hot tea for a cold that won't go away.

This wonderful curry is from the Mighty Spice cookbook by John Gregory-Smith, available on Amazon.com here. Read a full review of his book on the Burn! Blog here.

Whether you call it Chap Chee, Chap Chae, or Jap Chae (a combination of Japan and China),

this is a very popular dish that combines a variety of textures, colors, flavors, simple seasonings along with one of their staples, noodles. Koreans love beef and serve it more often that pork and chicken, and they never eat lamb or goat. Garlic, ginger, and sesame are common to most Korean beef dishes and this one is no exception. Traditionally, Chap Chee is spiced up with a bowl of kimchi. Available in Asian markets, it’s a fiery hot condiment containing fermented vegetables such as cabbage and turnips. An acquired taste! The meat will be easier to thinly slice if put in the freezer for about 30 minutes and have all the ingredients assembled before stir-frying.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Moroccan Tagines

by Nancy Gerlach 

 

Tagines or tajines are wonderfully aromatic North African stews that combine meats, poultry, chicken, or fish with fruits, vegetables and a large variety of spices. The centerpiece of Moroccan meals, there are literally hundreds of traditional tagines as well as many regional variations 

This recipe comes from Sam Etheridge, formerly of Ambrozia, now of Nob Hill Bar and Grill in Albuquerque, NM.
Lobster (or Shrimp) Corndogs with Chipolte Ketchup and Wasabi Mustard
 

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