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Heat Level - 5
This thick and delicious soup from North Africa should be served as a supper dish, which is when many thick, spicy soups are traditionally served.  Even though 10 cloves of garlic sounds like a lot, the garlic mellows as it cooks.  Serve it with crusty warm bread.

An unusual chili that could also be termed a stew. This is not for beginning chileheads but for the serious aficionado. The name was inspired by the pantywaist heat scales of most other chilis.

W.C. has taken some grief over the turnips and potatoes here, but does he care? In case it’s too hot, serve this with milk or beer.

This simple dish is for people who like their seafood spicy. Find more recipes and read about Dave DeWitt's Singapore trip in the article Singapore Fling By Dave De Witt

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Mit mit a, an Ethiopian spice mixture, is used to spice up and flavor stews, or w'ets.  It is made from the small and hot African chiles that we know as piquins and is sprinkled over raw meat (kitfo), especially lamb.
Pili pili, also called piri piri, is served as a table condiment in all West African countries, where it heats up grilled meat, poultry, shrimp, fish, and even vegtable dishes.  Nearly any green chile can be used to make this sauce.  Some recipes call for tomatoes or tomato sauce to be added, and some recipes call for red chiles, either fresh or dried.  To make Pili Pili Mayonaise, combine 1 tablespoon of this sauce with one cup of mayonaise and serve with cold, cooked, shelled sprimps or prawns.
Nowadays it's easy to re-create the chili that Wick used in the first cook-off against H. Allen Smith--just buy some of the famous Wick Fowler 2-Alarm Chili Mix. Or, you can follow the recipe below, which chili legend holds is Wick&rquo;s original version that he cooked in Terlingua in 1967. Remember to remove the Japanese chiles and the chilipiquins before serving. If this chili is too hot, Wick recommended drinking a pint of buttermilk.
This classic Yucatecan salsa is definitely wild. Xnipec, pronounced 
"SCHNEE-peck," is Mayan for “dog's nose.” Serve it--carefully--with
grilled poultry or fish.
This aromatic mixture from North Africa is also found in Turkey and Jordan.  It is sprinkled over tajines and vegetables.  Tunisian cooks make a paste of it with olive oil and spread it on bread before baking. The cayenne is optional.  Sumac seeds are found in Middle Eastern markets.
 

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