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Heat Level - 5

This creamy sauce delivers a double punch, from the horseradish and the chile. Serve it as an accompaniment to grilled salmon, poached fish, prime rib, or even corned beef. Horseradish is very volatile and loses its flavor and aroma quickly, so this sauce should be made just before serving.

This recipe was developed by chef Ed Arace of Panama Red's Beach Bar and Seafood Grille in Nashville, Tennessee, who comments: "I couldn't cook without peppers or hot sauce--even in my delicate dishes a little dash of sauce or a small amount of peppers will enhance it without overpowering it." This poultry dish, however, is not delicate but rather robust.

Here is a quick and easy twist on Louisiana hot sauce. The key here is to use fresh rather than dried chiles. Serve this sauce over fried foods such as fish or alligator.

Use as a topping for soups and noodles, or as a refreshing salad dressing. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator. The sauce will stay fresh for weeks if refrigerated.

Here is one of the best methods for processing and preserving large quantities of small chile pods quickly. The way is so basic that it is sometimes overlooked among preservation methods. You should have a powerful blender or food processor for this. To use, defrost the cubes and estimate 2 to 3 pods per cube. Use in recipes calling for minced or chopped small chiles.

Yeah, right. Okay, this is our spin on Mexican flavorings that would work on goat, as in cabrito, pit roasted goat. Can’t find goat at Winn-Dixie? Use this rub for either grilling or smoking beef, pork, and lamb.

Serve these caramelized onions in place of the creamed ones that grace many holiday tables. These too are sweet, but also hot and lower in fat and won’t fill you up! Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
This is adapted from The Chile Pepper Encyclopedia (William Morrow, 1999). Here is the beef stew or macaroni and cheese of New Mexico--a basic dish with as many variations as there are cooks. Add a warmed flour tortilla and you have a complete meal.
This curry dish is adapted from a recipe by "The King of Curry" in his recommended book, Pat Chapman’s Noodle Book. In it he says that "green curry is probably Thailand’s most popular dish, both inside and outside the country. Cooked correctly it is a delicate bland of fragrance and flavor, of subtle color laced together with creamy coconut milk. In fact the sauce is not and should not be green; it, and the chicken, is a buff-white color. It is the accompanying herbs -- basil and cilantro-- and, traditionally, pea aubergines, and huge numbers of tiny green Thai chiles that give the dish its greenness." Since pea aubergines (tiny eggplants) are somewhat bitter and difficult to find, they have been eliminated in this recipe.
Here is an unusal-- and spicy-- salad from Madagascar.
 

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