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Cooking Method - Boil
According to the waiters at Sanamluang, this noodle dish is named for the restaurant’s former parking attendant whose authoritarian ways were legendary. Any kind of mixed meat can be used, although to stay true to form requires leftover roast duck, beef meatballs and squid.

One of the most basic Chiltepin dishes known, this recipe is prepared only in the state of Sinaloa, where the Chiltepins produce fruits all year long. This simple soup is served in mountain villages, and everyone makes his own in a soup bowl.

There's nothing like a spiced cider to get you ready to beg for candy. If you can find hard cider, you can eliminate the brandy here; if not, use non-alcoholic cider plus the brandy. Serve with a cinnamon stick in each cup if you want.
Although new to many people, these colorful beans date back to the ancient, cliff-dwelling Anasazi Indians. Slightly sweeter than pinto beans, they also tend to hold their shape better when cooked. If not available, substitute pinto beans in this recipe.
Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of 
“Limes Ashore!”, the phrase called out by British sailors who found
limes growing on the Virgin Islands. The limes, originally planted by
the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. I guess that the bird peppers
would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders or
grilled fish. Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.

Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of "Limes Ashore!", the phrase called out by British sailors who found limes growing the islands. The limes, originally planted by the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. We presume that the bush peppers would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders.

Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.

This year we used about a pound of LC Cayenne pods to cook up a sweet and spicy Thai sauce. Unlike “Louisiana Style” hot sauce, this one is thick, almost like ketchup, and is a lot less vinegary. It is great with grilled shrimp, over rice, for Asian cooking, and even as a dip.

Read Harald Zoschke's entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

http://www.burn-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/pan-of-sauce.jpg

This recipe is considered to be the basic one for beans that will be added to chili when it's served--assuming, of course, that you are a "with beans" aficionado. There is a great debate about whether or not to soak the beans overnight. The only simple answer is that if the beans are soaked overnight, they will take about half as long to cook the next day.
This candy recipe makes good use of the syrup created as a byproduct when making candied chiles. Depending on the chiles used, the syrup can get pretty hot. Typically it has a consistency somewhere between corn syrup and molasses and looks clear, lightly tinted.
This exciting, thick soup marries the dark colors and flavors of the beans and chipotle chiles, but there's quite a few other ingredients as well. Serve this with a hearty bread and your favorite sharp cheese. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.
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