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Chile
To “mull” a beverage is to heat it with other ingredients to impart a 
flavor. We mulled over several formulas before choosing this one with
its pungent punch.
Here’s a great rub to use on meats that will be smoked or grilled. Since anchos are sold in fairly pliable condition, place them in the oven on low heat until they are brittle.
Here's a great rub to use on meats which will be smoked or grilled.
When I write “flavored,” I mean it, as I have chosen the chiles that 
impart the most distinct flavors. The raisiny flavor of the pasilla
melds with the apricot overtones of the habanero and the earthiness of
the New Mexican chile to create a finely-tuned fiery sipping vodka. Of
course, use an excellent vodka like Stolichnaya or Absolut. Note: This
recipe requires advance preparation.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 Oodles and Oodles of Asian Noodles

by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus 

Extra stuffing may be put in a buttered casserole dish and baked, covered, at 350 degrees F. for about 30 minutes.

This easy sweet-hot glaze, developed by fisherman James Perez (formerly the Home Shore), demonstrates a perfect marriage between fruit and Alaska salmon. Delicious on any cut of salmon, this glaze (enough for 2 pounds of fish) can be used with either grilled or baked fish.
In this land of the pampas and gauchos, beef is king. And beef is a traditional filling for empanadas that are a very popular appetizer, snack and/or picnic fare in Argentina. This recipe is rather similar to a Puerto Rican picadillo, so substitute pork if you wish.

A parrilla is a simple grill in Argentina, but the wonders it can create! As barbecue expert Steven Raichlen noted, “Argentina can be a forbidding place for a vegetarian.” Chimichurri is the sauce most commonly served with beef straight from the parrilla, and there are dozens—if not hundreds—of variations of it, and a debate about whether it should contain chiles. You know which side we favor, and our version of chimichurri contains green ají chiles. Since cattle are so large in Argentina, why not use a huge steak? Serve with grilled sweet potato and poblano chile kabobs, and black beans and rice.

No matter how you spell it—shisk kabob or sis kebabi—this robust specialty features skewered chunks of meat and onions marinated in oil and spices and then grilled over an open flame. The technique apparently originated in the Caucasus and then spread southward to Mediterranean countries. The traditional meat has always been leg of lamb, a meat that seems to be permitted by most major religions. To make a perfect kabob, remove any tough membrane from the meat, cut meat across the grain—and don’t forget that the meat must be marinated before grilling. Serve with a salad of tossed greens, ripe olives, and feta cheese and for dessert, baklava and Turkish coffee.

 

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