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Meal/Course - Condiment

Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of "Limes Ashore!", the phrase called out by British sailors who found limes growing the islands. The limes, originally planted by the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. We presume that the bush peppers would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders.

Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.

Popular throughout Southeast Asia, this garlic and chile based paste is used as a condiment that adds fire without greatly altering the taste of the dish. It is especially good stir-frys. This is a great recipe for using up any small chiles that are left at the end of the season. This paste will keep for up to 3 months in the refrigerator and it can also be frozen.
Horseradish is certainly not limited to prime rib, as evidenced by this recipe. According to Ron Smith of Smith and Smith, this is a great sauce to use both hot and cold. Use it heated over eggs, steak, and vegetables, or cold as a sandwich spread, or a dip for chips or veggies.
We found that it complemented both beef and fish tacos.
Just a great salsa!
Tart tomatillos, hot jalapeños, fresh lime, and sweet honey, all bound together with the creaminess of avocado, make this one a favorite sauce. Try it with any rich fish, like swordfish, salmon, mackerel, or bluefish.

To the members of the Madd Momma and The Kid barbecue team, sauce should be a finishing touch and only used during the final stages of barbecuing. In this recipe, they use honey to get the sweet heat they like.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

The Heat of Competition: The Jack Daniels' Championship

 

This versiion of the famous island seasoning is from Ann Marie Whittaker, who noted: "This is found in almost every home and is the secret to the success for many mouth-watering Bajan dishes." One of the favorite uses is to place it between the meat and skin of chicken pieces before grilling, baking, or frying.

Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

You can substitute ground piquin, Santaka, or even habanero for the cayenne in this recipe.
Rick Browne, Ph.B., host of the PBS show “Barbecue America” and the author of The Best Barbecue on Earth and nine other books, is supplying articles and recipes to the Fiery Foods& Barbecue SuperSite.
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