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Meal/Course - Condiment
Use a seedless watermelon, if you can find one and you'll save yourself a little hassle making this salsa. If you have pink and yellow watermelons you can use some of each for a prettier result. I like the combination of basil and watermelon, but you can also use cilantro or mint. Serve it over any kind of fish or seafood.
A we't or wa't is a traditional Ethiopian stew, spiced either with Berbere or this simpler blend of spices.  This spice mixture is usually added near the end of cooking a stew.
Pili pili, also called piri piri, is served as a table condiment in all West African countries, where it heats up grilled meat, poultry, shrimp, fish, and even vegtable dishes.  Nearly any green chile can be used to make this sauce.  Some recipes call for tomatoes or tomato sauce to be added, and some recipes call for red chiles, either fresh or dried.  To make Pili Pili Mayonaise, combine 1 tablespoon of this sauce with one cup of mayonaise and serve with cold, cooked, shelled sprimps or prawns.

Sauces in the annual Jack Daniel’s barbecue contest must include some of the host’s product. This recipe is a good example of what the judges look for. It comes from the Jack Daniel’s Old Time Barbecue Cookbook.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

The Heat of Competition: The Jack Daniels' Championship

 

Egyptians call any dish of raw vegetables a "salad"even though we would call this a dip or spread.
Pickles such as this one are commonly used in South Africa as a condiment to further spice up curries.  Also serve as a relish with chicken, turkey, lamb, or fish.

This is an all-purpose sop that can be used with any meat or poultry. It’s purpose is to keep the meat moist during the smoking process and to give the cook something to do during the long, boring, smoking process. Use a little sop mop to coat the meat.

This aromatic mixture from North Africa is also found in Turkey and Jordan.  It is sprinkled over tajines and vegetables.  Tunisian cooks make a paste of it with olive oil and spread it on bread before baking. The cayenne is optional.  Sumac seeds are found in Middle Eastern markets.

Michael and Diane Phillips: This is one of Michael’s favorite accompaniments to grilled sausages or hot dogs. It’s also good on hamburgers.

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