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Chile - Habanero
This stew recipe includes a small amount of salted beef, another holdover from "the old days," when that was the only way to ship beef, and it is an ingredient found in almost all the recipes for this stew. The usual meat for the Stoba is kid (goat or cabrito), but we have substituted lamb. If you have a source for goat, try it because it is delicious. The annatto oil is commonly called ruku.
This is best when made the night before and allowed to mellow out in the fridge. Serve with chopped raw onions, crisp fried tortillas, and sour cream. Magnifico!

Named from ahuacatl "testicle" and mole, meaning “mixture,” this pulpy sauce moved from strictly Mexican use into America around 1900 and slowly increased in popularity as the avocado became more available in American supermarkets.  It really took off after the introduction of corn chips in the 1960s and now is found pre-made in various packages everywhere, but many of them are bland and lack the full flavor of guacamole made from scratch.  This version is traditionally made with a molcajete y mano, a large Mexican mortar and pestle carved from volcanic rock. If you don't have a molcajete y mano, you can smash the avocados with a fork or potato masher. From the article Avocado Madness!

Here is a tasty option for cooking shark, or, for that matter, any firm fish that is big enough to have steaks cut from it, such as swordfish. We prefer to grill over hardwood rather than charcoal briquets, and two of the best woods to use are pecan and hickory. Mesquite can be substituted, but it imparts a strong flavor to the fish. Dave collected this recipe in Trinidad, where a dish called Shark and Bake is a specialty. Serve with conch chowder, curried cauliflower, potatoes, peas, and a fruit chutney.
This recipe and others can be found in the 12-part illustrated series "A World of Curries". You can read all about this unique Indian flavor here.

recipe image
The variety of cheeses in this upscale and tasty dish make it dangerously delicious! The chiles in the dish, as well as the flavored pasta, add a subtle punch and contrasts nicely with the cheeses and the herbs.
There are just about as many versions of vatapa as there are cooks who prepare it. Just as there are many versions, vatapa can be made with a variety ingredients that can include meat, such as pork, as well as seafood. My version is somewhat lighter than the traditional ones. I’ve eliminated the dende oil, which is a palm oil and can be difficult to find, and substituted coconut milk for the more traditional coconut cream.
There’s nothing like a little wasabi to perk up ceviche. Just make sure you add it at the last minute, right before serving. You can eat the ceviche from tall glasses, or pile it on a salad of spinach, green onions, and tomatoes, topped with wasabi mayonnaise. A crusty slice of toasted garlic bread goes well with this.
This classic Yucatecan salsa is definitely wild. Xnipec, pronounced 
"SCHNEE-peck," is Mayan for “dog's nose.” Serve it--carefully--with
grilled poultry or fish.
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