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Chile - Habanero
Grilling caramelizes the sugar and honey in the sauce, making the fruit sweeter. This is obviously a dessert, but it can be served as a side dish to barbecued ribs, poultry, or fish. Other firm fruits will work, such as peaches or pineapple, but make sure that they are slightly under ripe. It is difficult to grill ripe fruit.
This recipe is the Caribbean answer to Buffalo wings. Although it calls for the chicken to be grilled, the drumsticks can also be broiled, baked, or even deep-fried before being dipped in the sauce.
Stuffed eggs are the most obvious (and delicious) ways to use up left-over Easter eggs. There are any number of variations of the old standard, but these are special enough for an hors d’oeuvres party table. Because older eggs are easier to peel, be sure to use them when you need a smooth, clean egg. Use a pastry bag and pipe in the filling for a fancy presentation. 
Use this "hot" fruit compote to accent any breakfast or brunch. Since this habanero syrup compliments a wide variety of fruits, vary the ones you use depending on what is in season.
This will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.

If there were a typical eastern Caribbean hot sauce, this might be it. It has hints of Trinidad, Barbados, and even Grenada. To be perfectly authentic, you should buy or grow the red habaneros so popular in that part of the Caribbean, called Congo or bonney peppers. This will last up to eight weeks in the refrigerator.

This recipe was provided by author Kathy Gallantine. She collected it from Antonio Seja Torrez, a clam-picker in Baja. Every day at low tide, Antonio crawls through the mangroves and collects 500 pata de mula "clams," that are really mussels. He carries the several miles to the dock at Magdalena Bay, where he sells them for ten pesos apiece. His daily earnings come to about $2.00 U.S. "About enough to buy a kilo of beans," he says cheerfully. Try this recipe with true clams, but be prepared too pay a much higher price for them! Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This dish gets its heat from habanero chiles and a delicious twist from fresh mint. Make it when you have access to plenty of fresh oysters. If you don't have a habanero, you can substitute jalapenos.
Everywhere that I’ve traveled in Mexico where there is an abundance of fresh seafood, there is an abundance of ceviche. This version, which I was served in a small restaurant in the seafood market in Cancun, is a variation of the more typical fish, onion, and chile ceviche.

This recipe is a second version of the Ecuadorian specialty. The fish can be served as an appetizer or as a main dish for a refreshing summer meal. It is traditionally served with maiz tostada (toasted corn) or popcorn on the side. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

 

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