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This recipe is by Lois Ellen Frank, from her book Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations (Ten Speed Press, 2002). Both the venison and the juniper berries are available from mail-order sources. Of course, grape juice or wine would not have been available to the Maya, but Lois has adapted this recipe for the modern kitchen.
Mit mit a, an Ethiopian spice mixture, is used to spice up and flavor stews, or w'ets.  It is made from the small and hot African chiles that we know as piquins and is sprinkled over raw meat (kitfo), especially lamb.

This stock is good enough to serve as a first course consommé, in addition to using it as a basis for some of the recipes that follow. Baking or caramelizing the vegetables before adding the water gives an additional richness to the stock. If you wish, adding a 1 to 2 inch piece of kombu seaweed will also add a further depth of flavor. This stock will keep for 2 days, covered, in the refrigerator. It can also be frozen; divide it into 2- or 3-cup freezer containers. Feel free to add any vegetable trimmings from the bag in your freezer, but beware of cabbage or broccoli, whose flavors tend to dominate the stock.

Read Dave DeWitt's article on Veggie Soups for Spring here.

This recipe and others can be found in the 12-part illustrated series "A World of Curries". You can read all about this unique Indian flavor here.

 

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This recipe dates to 1976, when W.C. created it for his first restaurant, the Morning Glory Cafe. It is meatless and dairyless, but "designed for a meat-eater's taste," according to W.C. It is easily frozen or canned.

If ever there were a macho potato salad, this is it! Grilled cactus and chopped jicima add an unexpected twist to this warm, spicy red potato salad. To complete the Southwestern theme, these ingredients are tossed in a dressing of freshly squeezed lime juice and adobo sauce mixed with a heavy dose of chopped cilantro. Though the cactus adds a unique flavor to this salad, if it is not available at your local grocery store, it can be omitted.

In 1969, our Canadian neighbors in Calgary invented the Caesar Cocktail to celebrate a new restaurant. The drink now consistently ranks in the top ten favorites. With the addition of wasabi, this recipe takes the Bloody Caesar to where no drink has gone before.
There’s nothing like a little wasabi to perk up ceviche. Just make sure you add it at the last minute, right before serving. You can eat the ceviche from tall glasses, or pile it on a salad of spinach, green onions, and tomatoes, topped with wasabi mayonnaise. A crusty slice of toasted garlic bread goes well with this.

Wasabi mayo is delicious on grilled salmon, salmon cakes or deep-fried oysters (and most any other seafood). Try perking up anything that uses mayonnaise, such as deviled eggs, tuna salad sandwiches, or the po’boy sandwiches below. This mayo recipe eliminates today’s problems with raw eggs and possible salmonella because the egg base is heated before emulsifying it into mayonnaise. Serve this over grilled tuna or other fish.

Now that you’ve made the wasabi mayonnaise, why not make some wasabi po’boy sandwiches that’ll take your breath away? The following recipe makes four servings.

 

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