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This sauce is an excellent accompaniment to grilled meats, including sausages, as well as cold meats (beef, tongue, pork, ham) and smoked fish (salmon, sprats). You can find this recipe and others in the article Siberian Hot Stuff By Sharon Hudgins

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Boneless pork loin is naturally very lean and very easy to overcook, so watch it carefully. The apple stuffing nicely compliments the relatively mild flavor of the pork. Serve with roasted sweet potato wedges, sugar snap peas, and cranberry sauce. Note: This recipe requires some advanced preparation.

This easy sweet-hot glaze, developed by fisherman James Perez (formerly the Home Shore), demonstrates a perfect marriage between fruit and Alaska salmon. Delicious on any cut of salmon, this glaze (enough for 2 pounds of fish) can be used with either grilled or baked fish.
In this land of the pampas and gauchos, beef is king. And beef is a traditional filling for empanadas that are a very popular appetizer, snack and/or picnic fare in Argentina. This recipe is rather similar to a Puerto Rican picadillo, so substitute pork if you wish.

No matter how you spell it—shisk kabob or sis kebabi—this robust specialty features skewered chunks of meat and onions marinated in oil and spices and then grilled over an open flame. The technique apparently originated in the Caucasus and then spread southward to Mediterranean countries. The traditional meat has always been leg of lamb, a meat that seems to be permitted by most major religions. To make a perfect kabob, remove any tough membrane from the meat, cut meat across the grain—and don’t forget that the meat must be marinated before grilling. Serve with a salad of tossed greens, ripe olives, and feta cheese and for dessert, baklava and Turkish coffee.

Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of "Limes Ashore!", the phrase called out by British sailors who found limes growing the islands. The limes, originally planted by the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. We presume that the bush peppers would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders.

Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.

Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of 
“Limes Ashore!”, the phrase called out by British sailors who found
limes growing on the Virgin Islands. The limes, originally planted by
the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. I guess that the bird peppers
would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders or
grilled fish. Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.
Popular throughout Southeast Asia, this garlic and chile based paste is used as a condiment that adds fire without greatly altering the taste of the dish. It is especially good stir-frys. This is a great recipe for using up any small chiles that are left at the end of the season. This paste will keep for up to 3 months in the refrigerator and it can also be frozen.
Whisk together all ingredients and allow to sit, covered, at room temperature for thirty minutes to blend the flavors.

These quick snacks have a light and spicy Asian twist. You can easily omit the chicken for vegetarian guests.

 

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