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Meal/Course - Sauce/Marinade/Rub

This recipe is an adaptation of a recipe originally printed in the Officers’ Wives Club Cookbook from Clark AFB in the Philippines. If desired, boneless chicken breasts could also be added (or substituted) to the recipe. (This recipe requires advance preparation.)

The ingredients of this specialty from Russia are similar to the 
traditional Mexican pico de gallo salsa with the exception that celery
replaces tomatoes and dill is added. Georgians spread it thickly onto a
piece of lavash (Georgian bread) and wolf it down no matter how many
chiles are added to it. Please note that this recipe requires advance
preparation, as the adzhiga tastes better when it's served 1 to 3 days
after making.
Island legend holds that the name of this sauce is a corruption of 
“Limes Ashore!”, the phrase called out by British sailors who found
limes growing on the Virgin Islands. The limes, originally planted by
the Spanish, would save them from scurvy. I guess that the bird peppers
would save them from bland food. Add this sauce to seafood chowders or
grilled fish. Note: This recipes requires advance preparation.

This year we used about a pound of LC Cayenne pods to cook up a sweet and spicy Thai sauce. Unlike “Louisiana Style” hot sauce, this one is thick, almost like ketchup, and is a lot less vinegary. It is great with grilled shrimp, over rice, for Asian cooking, and even as a dip.

Read Harald Zoschke's entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

http://www.burn-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/pan-of-sauce.jpg

Ata is the Yoruba word for chile pepper, and Nigerian chiles range from
the tiny ata wewe to the large ata funfun. It is served like a relish or
dip with many West African dishes, particularly grilled meats.
Variation: Add 1 bell pepper, chopped

This is a dry cure that can be used on about five pounds of pork bellies or fish such as salmon. Read more about making bacon in Mike Stines' article here.

These spicy kebabs can be found on the island of St. Croix, as well as many other islands, where fruits abound. Because of the abundance of tropical fruits, the combination of meat and fruit is not that unusual, especially with the addition of a Caribbean habanero hot sauce or the peppers themselves. Serve the kebabs with a rice dish and a cool-down salad. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation. From the article Mango Madness!

To preserve the distinctive flavor of the habaneros, don't cook them 
with the sauce but add them afterwards. This sauce will keep for weeks
in the refrigerator. Use it to spice up eggs, sandwiches, soups, and
seafood. This was the original, classic habanero sauce that has been
imitated in commercial products countless times.

Ray Lampe, aka "Dr. BBQ" is a competition cook on the barbecue cookoff circuit and the author of four books, including his latest, The NFL Gameday Cookbook. The following is an excerpt from the archives of "Ask Dr. BBQ"

Here’s Ray's version of a competition injection blend. This goes well in a slow cooked pork shoulder.

 

This sauce works particularly well with grilled beef, and it's great on steaks of all kinds.

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