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Meal/Course - Sauce/Marinade/Rub
This recipe is part of a five-part series devoted to chipotles--those many varieties of smoked chiles. You can go here to start reading--and cooking with--chipotles of all kinds.
recipe image
This recipe is part of a five-part series devoted to chipotles--those many varieties of smoked chiles. You can go here to start reading--and cooking with--chipotles of all kinds.

recipe image
This recipe is part of a five-part series devoted to chipotles--those many varieties of smoked chiles. You can go here to start reading--and cooking with--chipotles of all kinds.
recipe image
This recipe is part of a five-part series devoted to chipotles--those many varieties of smoked chiles. You can go here to start reading--and cooking with--chipotles of all kinds.

recipe image
This all-purpose sauce recipe is from the southern part of New Mexico, 
where green chile is the one of the state's top food crops and is used
more commonly than the red form. It is a great topping for enchiladas
and is often served over scrambled eggs. Variations: To thicken the
sauce, make a roux by sauteing 1 tablespoon flour in 1 tablespoon
vegetable oil, taking care not to let it burn. Slowly stir the roux into
the sauce and cook to the desired thickness. Coriander and Mexican
oregano may be added to taste. For added heat, add more New Mexican
chiles or a serrano or two.
Horseradish is a classic condiment that’s served with roast meats—beef 
in particular—and cooked or raw vegetables. Since horseradish is very
volatile (the active ingredient is isothiocyanate) and loses its flavor
and aroma quickly, this simple sauce should be made close to serving
time. For an added hit of chile heat, I sometimes add ground habanero chile.
This method of making chile sauce differs from others using fresh New 
Mexican chiles because these chiles aren't roasted and peeled first.
Because of the high sugar content of fresh red chiles, this sauce is
sweeter than most. I harvested some chiles from his garden one late
summer day, made a batch of this sauce, and ate every drop as a soup! It
makes a tasty enchilada sauce, too.
Until recently, New Mexican chiles were rarely used in Texas cooking. 
But as the popularity of chili con carne cookoff contests increased,
cooks began experimenting with chiles other than just piquíns and
jalapeños. Here is one result of this broadening of the chile pepper
experience.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. This seasoning can be rubbed on steak immediately before grilling.

 

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