• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Cooking Method - Simmer

This recipe appeared in the article Bacon-Wrapped Brats and Dogs, Oh My on the Burn! Blog. (excerpted from The Tex-Mex Grill and Backyard Barbacoa Cookbook by Robb Walsh

Although the title of this Cajun-based recipe is Barbecue Shrimp, the dish is actually cooked, not barbecued. Using the sauce as a condiment reduces the need for a number of ingredients as well as making it very easy to prepare.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Borneo's Forest Food

Article and Location Photos by Victor Paul Borg

 

The most basic brine consists of water and kosher salt, but because the salt solution is absorbed into the fish, it can also be used to carry other flavors with it to enhance the smoked fish. This recipe works well for any fish fillet or whole fish that will be hot-smoked.

This recipe is considered to be the basic one for beans that will be added to chili when it's served--assuming, of course, that you are a "with beans" aficionado. There is a great debate about whether or not to soak the beans overnight. The only simple answer is that if the beans are soaked overnight, they will take about half as long to cook the next day.
"Chop" is an Afican Slang word for food or meal, and this recipe fits that term because it is a big meal!  It contains some of the most basic ingredients of West Africa with garnishes similar to curry dishes--another food influence in Africa.  In West Africa, the beef would probably be substituted with wild game, buffalo, antelope, etc.  Use your imagination here in North America--elk, venison, antelope, or lamb.  Serve the huge pot of stew and incredible condiments buffet style.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Moroccan Tagines

by Nancy Gerlach 

 

Tagines or tajines are wonderfully aromatic North African stews that combine meats, poultry, chicken, or fish with fruits, vegetables and a large variety of spices. The centerpiece of Moroccan meals, there are literally hundreds of traditional tagines as well as many regional variations 

 
Beef Tagine with Green Olives 

Berbere is the famous, or should we say, infamous, scorching Eithiopian hot sauce.  One recipe we ran across called for over a cup of powdered cayenne!  It is used as an ingredient in a number of dishes, a coating when drying meats, and as a side dish or condiment.  Tribal custom dictated that it be served with kifo, raw meat dishes that are served warm.  This sauce will keep for a couple of month under refrigeration.  Serve sparingly as a condiment with grilled meats and poultry or add to soups and stews.  Extremely Hot!

Ray Lampe, aka "Dr. BBQ" is a competition cook on the barbecue cookoff circuit and the author of four books, including his latest, The NFL Gameday Cookbook. The following is an excerpt from the archives of "Ask Dr. BBQ"

Here’s Ray's version of a competition injection blend. This goes well in a slow cooked pork shoulder.

 

Slow cooking is the key to a good biriani.  The Indian origina of this South African dish are evident with the many spices that are included.  It is frequently served at weddings and other celebrations.
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.

liquid cialis for sale, order xanax cod, best way to use cialis