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Cooking Method - Simmer
The chiles that are traditionally used for this sauce are the ones pulled off the ristras or strings of dried chiles. Ristras are not just used for decoration--this is one method of sun drying or preserving the fall chile crop for use throughout the year. Use this sauce in a number of dishes, as a topping for enchiladas and tacos, as a basis for stews like posole, or any recipe that calls for a red sauce.
'This salsa is served either smooth or as a salsa that has texture. It's best made with fully ripe tomatoes, but if they aren't available, canned tomatoes can be substituted. '
In this recipe, the chicken absorbs the flavors of what it is simmered in. You can use hard taco shells for more traditional tacos if you wish.
Here's another mulled cider that contains two chiles, the mild ancho and 
the super-hot habanero. The ancho adds the raisiny overtones while the
habanero supplies an additional fruity heat. Serve this cider in large
mugs around a roaring fire in the winter.
The word capon translates as "castrated" but in this case merely means seedless. Yes, dried chiles such as anchos and pasillas can be stuffed, but they must be softened in hot water first. They have an entirely different flavor than their greener, more vegetable-like versions.
This is a Greek dish that is served as an appetizer with a loaf of French bread. The diners tear off pieces of the bread and spread the chiles and garlic over it. This dish has big, bold flavors, so it is not for the timid consumers.
Chili historian Everett Lee DeGolyer was the owner of The Saturday Review of Literature, and was also, according to H. Allen Smith, "a world traveler, a gourmet, and the Solomon of the chili bowl." Here is the historian's recipe in his own words.
From the famous iconoclast and author of The Great Chili Confrontation, here's the recipe that infuriated Texans after it was published in Holiday Magazine in 1967. Smith had the gall to title his article "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do." Once again, the directions are in Smith's own words.

Jalapeno, habanero and Scotch bonnet are the most common types of fresh chiles found in Miami cuisine. Plenty of chipotles (smoked jalapenos sold both dry and canned) are used too, as well as the many other dried varieties available. Though most recipes call for some type of chile, the real source of heat in many Latin and Caribbean dishes is the hot sauce. Here, I have included two versions. The Chipotle-Habanero Sauce is a thinner, Latin-style sauce with a scorching finish, and the other is a chunky Caribbean-style version with a little sweetness to temper the heat.

Note: this recipe requires advance preparation.

The smoked red jalapeño, known as the chipotle chile, has gained such 
popularity that there's even a couple of cookbooks devoted to it! It
particularly works well with barbecuing and grilling, both of which have
considerable smoke associated with them.
 

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