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Cuisine - Southwestern
When you order "green sauce" in Texas, this is what you will be served. 
It differs from New Mexico's green sauce in that the color is derived
from tomatillos rather than from green chiles. This sauce can be used as
a dipping sauce, with enchiladas, or as a topping for grilled poultry or
fish.
This easy, basic recipe uses the combination of a rub and a sauce to create the taste of a traditional barbecue for those who don't have a pit or a smoker.
This is best when made the night before and allowed to mellow out in the fridge. Serve with chopped raw onions, crisp fried tortillas, and sour cream. Magnifico!

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Mascarene Chile Cuisine

 

By Dave DeWitt

 

An unusual chili that could also be termed a stew. This is not for beginning chileheads but for the serious aficionado. The name was inspired by the pantywaist heat scales of most other chilis.

W.C. has taken some grief over the turnips and potatoes here, but does he care? In case it’s too hot, serve this with milk or beer.

This recipe is by Lois Ellen Frank, from her book Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations (Ten Speed Press, 2002). Both the venison and the juniper berries are available from mail-order sources. Of course, grape juice or wine would not have been available to the Maya, but Lois has adapted this recipe for the modern kitchen.
Although mild to the taste, the flavor of the chile really comes through in this pie.

If ever there were a macho potato salad, this is it! Grilled cactus and chopped jicima add an unexpected twist to this warm, spicy red potato salad. To complete the Southwestern theme, these ingredients are tossed in a dressing of freshly squeezed lime juice and adobo sauce mixed with a heavy dose of chopped cilantro. Though the cactus adds a unique flavor to this salad, if it is not available at your local grocery store, it can be omitted.

This stunning ice cream is from Suzy Dayton, former pastry chef at the Coyote Cafe, who served it at the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Festival, where we collected the recipe.
Nowadays it's easy to re-create the chili that Wick used in the first cook-off against H. Allen Smith--just buy some of the famous Wick Fowler 2-Alarm Chili Mix. Or, you can follow the recipe below, which chili legend holds is Wick&rquo;s original version that he cooked in Terlingua in 1967. Remember to remove the Japanese chiles and the chilipiquins before serving. If this chili is too hot, Wick recommended drinking a pint of buttermilk.
 

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