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Cuisine - Southwestern
This powder is used to make chili con carne and replaces the commercial type; experiment with the ingredients and adjust them to your taste.
There are as many versions of chorizo in Mexico and the Southwest as there are of enchiladas. Essentially, it is a hot and spicy sausage that is served with eggs for breakfast, as a filling for tostados or tacos, or mixed with refried beans. This Sonoran version is spicier than most, and, in addition, it is served crumbled rather than being formed into patties.
This novelty was first served in 1988 for the symposium on wild chiles at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix and at the Fiesta de los Chiles at the Tucson Botanical Gardens. It is very hot in the proportions given (despite the tendency of ice cream to cut the heat), so you may want to reduce the quantity of Chiltepins.

From the little village of Chimayó, New Mexico comes what many chileheads consider to be the finest tasting red chile. We use it in our enchilada sauces and for making rubs such as this one. The smoky taste of the chipotle potatoes is a nice complement to the grilled steak. Serve the steak and potatoes with mixed green and yellow snap beans and jalapeño cornbread.

The smoked red jalapeño, known as the chipotle chile, has gained such 
popularity that there's even a couple of cookbooks devoted to it! It
particularly works well with barbecuing and grilling, both of which have
considerable smoke associated with them.
This chipotle sauce is a version of coauthor Chuck's best-selling brown hot sauce, Smokey Chipotle® Hot Sauce, manufactured by Sauces & Salsas, Ltd. under the Montezuma® brand. A tasty way to reconstitute dried chipotle chiles is to place them in a bowl and cover them with cider vinegar. After several days, the chiles will be reconstituted and will be plump.
This all-purpose sauce recipe is from the southern part of New Mexico, 
where green chile is the one of the state's top food crops and is used
more commonly than the red form. It is a great topping for enchiladas
and is often served over scrambled eggs. Variations: To thicken the
sauce, make a roux by sauteing 1 tablespoon flour in 1 tablespoon
vegetable oil, taking care not to let it burn. Slowly stir the roux into
the sauce and cook to the desired thickness. Coriander and Mexican
oregano may be added to taste. For added heat, add more New Mexican
chiles or a serrano or two.
This is a basic barbecue sauce for pork or beef or to use as a base for your own creations! It could be either served warmed as a table sauce or brushed on the meat during the last 30 minutes or so of smoking.
This salsa is prettiest when you dice everything into pieces 1/4-inch square. It takes time, but people will appreciate it!
Although a bit of effort to prepare, this sweet and hot jelly goes well poured over a brick of cream cheese or just atop some crackers. It is also good when melted and used as a glaze for chicken or pork. Use caution to avoid breathing the vapors while processing or cooking the chiles. Be sure to wear food-safe gloves when handling habanero peppers and wash hands, knives, and cutting boards thoroughly, first in cold water and soap and then again with hot water and soap. Do not touch eyes, nose, mouth, or other sensitive body parts when handling the chiles.
 

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