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Chile - Thai

This is a favorite soup at The Regent Resort Chiang Mai. It is well worth the effort to prepare it.

Foo Swasdee, a restaurant owner and sauce manufacturer in Austin, Texas, offers a unique and very flavorful appetizer that should be made a few hours before your party or dinner.

Foo Swasdee, a restaurant owner and sauce manufacturer in Austin, Texas, offers a unique and very flavorful appetizer that should be made a few hours before your party or dinner.

 

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 Oodles and Oodles of Asian Noodles

by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus 

 

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Making Thailand's "Chile Water"

Story and Photos by Austin Bush

 

Nam phrik kapi is probably the most well known nam phrik in Thailand. As the name suggests, it is made with kapi, a salted and fermented paste of fine shrimp known as khoei and is always served with fresh and/or parboiled vegetables, as well as egg-battered deep-fried vegetables, as described below. The amount of ingredients listed below for the nam phrik are largely for reference; a Thai chef would virtually never use measuring instruments to cook, and a dish is usually made to taste, keeping in mind a desired balance of the four tastes: sour, spicy, salty and sweet. 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Making Thailand's "Chile Water"

Story and Photos by Austin Bush

This is the most basic form of the family of spicy relishes known as nam phrik in Thailand. Nam plaa phrik is spooned over one's rice to spice up bland food, much the way salt is used in the west. 

This is the typical Thai chile sauce that is found in many forms--served in restaurants, bottled, and made in homes. There are many variations, of which this is probably the most basic. It is served with almost every Thai appetizer and entree.

It may seem like cheating, but I like to use canned curry paste for this dish since it avoids the work of chopping and pounding that homemade curry paste involves. This dish takes its name from the northern Malaysian port city, but in Thailand the sauce is creamier and richer than the dry dark curries popular there.

This is the method used by chef Anthony Tuttle at the Marriott Phuket Resort and Spa’s cooking school to prepare those delicious prawns. Serve the prawns with jasmine rice.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 Oodles and Oodles of Asian Noodles

by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus 

 

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