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Heat Level - 3

In 1989, Sheldon P. Wimpfen, of Luray, Virginia, wrote that he had been a chili cook for fifty-five of his seventy-five years and that fact makes him an expert on the subject. He lambasted us for our "mistaken tales" about the origin of chili con carne. He enclosed as his evidence the first recipe ever used for chili con carne, dating from approximately 15,000 B.C. The ancient recipe which follows was invented by the Alaxsxaq Indians of the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on the Bering Land Bridge. He apologized in advance for any insult to whale lovers and wrote, "that's just the way they cook up there."

This recipe and others can be found in the 12-part illustrated series "A World of Curries". You can read all about this unique Indian flavor here.

 

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Jambalaya is the kind of dish that can feed a big crowd. It takes a long time to cook, but it seems to get eaten pretty fast! Normally made with some combination of shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage, this recipe takes on an exotic twist with smoky wild boar bacon, chunks of alligator tail meat and kangaroo sausage.
This low-fat, high-flavor recipe is based on one provided by the National Pork Producers Council. By using a commercial salsa, this simple-to-prepare chili can be ready to serve in about a half an hour.
This marinated spicy salad is rather like the traditional Mexican Christmas Eve Salad and takes advantage of fall vegetables. Substitute celery for the jicama, add oranges or apples, and you have a lower-fat take on a Waldorf salad.

This hearty soup combines several fall crops, namely squash, apples, and of course chile. Add a salad, crusty bread, and a nice wine and you have a memorable holiday meal.

Xinjiang, which borders Mongolia, is noted for its barbecued lamb even though lamb is rarely eaten in other parts of China. In fact, the Mongolian tribes introduced lamb to the rest of China. This simple barbecue could easily be prepared by the nomads on the plains of Xinjiang. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.
This recipe is also attributed to Big Daddy. Since yak meat is impossible to find, substitute buffalo or very lean beef.
Pickles such as this one are commonly used in South Africa as a condiment to further spice up curries.  Also serve as a relish with chicken, turkey, lamb, or fish.

This is an all-purpose sop that can be used with any meat or poultry. It’s purpose is to keep the meat moist during the smoking process and to give the cook something to do during the long, boring, smoking process. Use a little sop mop to coat the meat.

 

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