• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Heat Level - 4
This recipe, which I found in a 1940s Trinidadian cookbook, is probably 
one of the earliest methods of preserving peppers in the tropics. It is
also called “pepper wine.” The sherry, which gradually picks up heat
from the bird peppers, is sprinkled into soups and stews and makes them
quite exotic. The peppers can be either fresh or dried. It is used as a
condiment and is sprinkled over soups, main dishes, and side dishes.
Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This is the universally favorite way to prepare venison. Venison is quite lean yet very flavorful. It makes a wonderful chili that doesn't have a fatty flavor. The slow cooking, chiles, and seasonings tremove any wild taste the meat might have. It freezes beautifully, so double the recipe and freeze a batch for another evening meal. Substitute elk if you wish.

There’s nothing like a little wasabi to perk up ceviche. Just make sure you add it at the last minute, right before serving. You can eat the ceviche from tall glasses, or pile it on a salad of spinach, green onions, and tomatoes, topped with wasabi mayonnaise. A crusty slice of toasted garlic bread goes well with this.

Pili pili, often called piri piri, is served as a table condiment in
West Africa, where it heats up grilled meat, poultry, shrimp, and fish.
Nearly any green chile can be used to make this sauce. Some recipes call
for tomatoes or tomato sauce to be added.

Here is the traditional way the Sumatrans cook the often-tough meat of the water buffalo--by slowly simmering it in coconut milk.  This recipe takes some time to make, but it's worth it.  It keeps for months in the freezer, so make a lot.  Serve the rendang over rice.

The region located next to Mongolia, called Xinjiang, is noted for its barbecue lamb, or mutton, even though lamb is rarely eaten in other parts of China. In fact, the Mongolian tribes were the ones who introduced lamb to the rest of China. It’s easy to visualize this simple barbecue being prepared by the nomads on the steppes of Xinjiang. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
Popular with the Yemenite Jews in Israel and in the Middle East, this 
hot sauce starts with a paste of garlic and peppers plus whatever spices
the individual cook chooses, along with cilantro and/or parsley. There
are two versions, this green one and a red one that uses red sweet and
hot peppers. Tomatoes are sometimes added to tone down the sauce, which
can be quite spicy. This quick and easy sauce serves as a table
condiment, as a sauce for grilled fish or meat or for eggs, or can be
added to soups and stews just before serving. It goes especially well
with lamb kabobs.
So named because it was served to visitors of chili con carne cookoffs 
by the Red Ass Chili Team. This mix will spice up your morning and
possibly help with that hangover from the night before. Omit the
habanero unless you like it extremely hot! I've heard that this mix is
also good without alcohol, but I've never tried it that way.
«StartPrev11121314NextEnd»
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.