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Cuisine - African
Here is my version of the classic hot sauce of Rórigues Island in the 
Mascarenes. It is very thick, so feel free to thin with more water if
you want. You’d think that this sauce might be sour, but it’s not–the
sugar in the red chiles seems to temper the tart lemons. Any fresh red
chiles can be used, and you can adjust the heat level to your liking.
The yield is high here, but the color is so beautiful that you should
put the excess in decorative bottles as gifts for your friends. It will
keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. Serve it over fish or other
seafood.
Plantains, those banana relatives that are eaten as a vegtable, are cultivated in many African countries.  This melange of sweet and hot platains make a delicious crunchy appetizer.  Serve it wit Ugandan Groundnut Sauce.

There are many meat-based hot sauces in Africa, but also some distinctly vegetarian sauces such as this one from Ethiopia.  Sever this sauce over starchy dishes such as plantains, yams, or rice.

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Moroccan Tagines

by Nancy Gerlach 

 

Tagines or tajines are wonderfully aromatic North African stews that combine meats, poultry, chicken, or fish with fruits, vegetables and a large variety of spices. The centerpiece of Moroccan meals, there are literally hundreds of traditional tagines as well as many regional variations 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Moroccan Tagines

by Nancy Gerlach 

 

Tagines or tajines are wonderfully aromatic North African stews that combine meats, poultry, chicken, or fish with fruits, vegetables and a large variety of spices. The centerpiece of Moroccan meals, there are literally hundreds of traditional tagines as well as many regional variations 

Even though the papaya is a native of the Wester Hemisphere, papayas have been cultivated all over the world in semitropical zones. The exotic flavor of this fruit combines the dried red chile and mace to give it a most wonderful taste in this South African recipe.
Few people have ever heard of the Mascarenes, and these islands are more 
known by their individual names: Réunion, Mauritius, and Ródrigues. They
are a departement of France and lie hundred of miles east of Madagascar,
hundreds of miles away from each other, and although they vary greatly
in geography, culture, and religion, they have one great thing in
common: a love of chile peppers. On all three islands, chiles of every
size and heat level are lovingly grown and added to a cuisines that can
generically be called Creole. Rebecca Chastenet de Gry, one of my
writers, collected this recipe for me on Réunion Island. She wrote:
"Alter the heat in this extremely hot salsa by changing the chiles used.
Traditionally the smaller piquin or bird's eye chiles are the types
preferred, but milder ones, such as red serranos, can be used." Serve
it--easy does it--over clams, other shellfish, or grilled fish fillets.

This recipe is from Madagascar.

The Heat Scale varies on this one, depending on the amount of Madagascar Sauce you use.

This recipe is from the article Mighty, Mysterious Mauritian Mazavaroo By Leyla Loued-Khenissi

recipe image

Gombo means okra in West Africa, and that vegetable is the primary thickening agent of this simple sauce from Ghana.  The sauce can be served like a soup or poured over potatoes, plantains, or other starchy tubers.

 

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