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Chile - Ancho
Here's another mulled cider that contains two chiles, the mild ancho and 
the super-hot habanero. The ancho adds the raisiny overtones while the
habanero supplies an additional fruity heat. Serve this cider in large
mugs around a roaring fire in the winter.
The word capon translates as "castrated" but in this case merely means seedless. Yes, dried chiles such as anchos and pasillas can be stuffed, but they must be softened in hot water first. They have an entirely different flavor than their greener, more vegetable-like versions.
This recipe is part of a five-part series devoted to chipotles--those many varieties of smoked chiles. You can go here to start reading--and cooking with--chipotles of all kinds.
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Roasted coffee beans can be just as intense and flavor packed as the fresh spices I use in barbecue rubs, like cumin and peppercorns. Ground with a whole pack of spices, coffee adds richness and a toasty bitterness to this rub, my new favorite for beef and lamb. And roasted coffee and smoky chipotle together have as much jolt as a double espresso.
Here's a simple dessert that's full of raisiny ancho chile flavor.

This is Bhutanese Comfort Food! It may also be the simplest dish you will ever make. Read more about the unique culture and food of Bhutan here.


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Yeah, right. Okay, this is our spin on Mexican flavorings that would work on goat, as in cabrito, pit roasted goat. Can’t find goat at Winn-Dixie? Use this rub for either grilling or smoking beef, pork, and lamb.

A purchased cake works well in this recipe and you don’t have to go to the trouble of baking one from scratch. You can substitute Kahlua or other coffee liqueur for the Grand Marnier, and you can use other fruits such as pineapple.

Although many Southwest barbecues and grilled meats utilize mesquite, it is not the only aromatic wood to use--experiment with pecan, apple, peach, and grape clippings. If you use charcoal for the main fire, be sure to soak the wood for an hour in water before grilling. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

Anchos are the dried chiles I use most for they have the best balance of fruity, spicy and earthy flavors. Ancho powder gives this glaze its appealing brick-red color and warm—not fiery—flavor. I definitely find that tuna needs intense flavors, like orange and allspice, to lighten it up and show off that meaty texture.

 

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