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Meal/Course - Appetizer/Hors d'oeuvre
Ideal as a starter (appetizer) course, these crispy chicken wings can also be prepared under the broiler on your stove.

This recipe, along with other sizzling holiday snacks, can be found in the article

Sizzling Snacks for Holiday Entertaining by Dave DeWitt
These interesting corn cakes from Ghana can be eaten hot or cold, alone, or with roasted peanuts for a snack or appetizer.

The first food I prepared with a salt block was a Szechuan citrus scallop and shrimp appetizer (this could also be an entrée if you increase the number of shrimp and scallops per serving). Following the manufacturer’s recommendations I placed the dry, room temperature salt block on an unheated grill and turned the grill on to its lowest temperature allowing the salt block to warm (this also removes any moisture that might be on the block). Then I slowly increased the grill’s temperature until the salt block reached the desired temperature… for me the process took about 45 minutes until the block reached 550 degrees F. The key is to slowly increase the temperature, otherwise the block may shatter.

Once the block is at the desired temperature, add the food and cook until done. For the shrimp and scallops, it only took about two or three minutes per side until they were done.

To bake the wings, place in a roasting pan. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake in a 450 degrees F oven until lightly browned and cooked through, about 30 minutes.

Named from ahuacatl "testicle" and mole, meaning “mixture,” this pulpy sauce moved from strictly Mexican use into America around 1900 and slowly increased in popularity as the avocado became more available in American supermarkets.  It really took off after the introduction of corn chips in the 1960s and now is found pre-made in various packages everywhere, but many of them are bland and lack the full flavor of guacamole made from scratch.  This version is traditionally made with a molcajete y mano, a large Mexican mortar and pestle carved from volcanic rock. If you don't have a molcajete y mano, you can smash the avocados with a fork or potato masher. From the article Avocado Madness!

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Mascarene Chile Cuisine

 

By Dave DeWitt

 

This recipe is based on the Tunisian grilled salads, as mechouia means roasted. This recipe is easily prepared on the grill and can be served as a relish, dip, or spread. As might be expected, it can also be served with a flat, unleavened bread such as pita. Use a mortar and pestle for a traditional method of grinding the grilled vegetables, or just mash and mix with a fork in a bowl. For a much hotter dip, substitute jalapeño chiles.
This recipe hails from Algeria, where it is a popular appetizer.  Note the use of paprika here -- it was introduced form Hungary via Spain.
There’s nothing like a little wasabi to perk up ceviche. Just make sure you add it at the last minute, right before serving. You can eat the ceviche from tall glasses, or pile it on a salad of spinach, green onions, and tomatoes, topped with wasabi mayonnaise. A crusty slice of toasted garlic bread goes well with this.
 

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