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Cuisine - Asian
Jambalaya is the kind of dish that can feed a big crowd. It takes a long time to cook, but it seems to get eaten pretty fast! Normally made with some combination of shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage, this recipe takes on an exotic twist with smoky wild boar bacon, chunks of alligator tail meat and kangaroo sausage.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Borneo's Forest Food

Article and Location Photos by Victor Paul Borg

 

Chileheads requiring pungency other than from the won tons can add five or six whole chile pods such as santaka or piquin to this broth. Remove them before serving.
Square dumpling wrappers are not just for making dumplings. They can also be cut into short, 1/4- to 1/2-inch-wide strips and cooked with delicious results. This spicy crab-and-bacon stir-fry combination was given to me by an Indonesian friend living in New England. Indonesians love hot, spicy foods, and this dish is no exception. Feel free to add the fresh chilies to your taste. I do not use oil for this stir-fry. The bacon usually has enough fat for stir-frying the other ingredients.
The region located next to Mongolia, called Xinjiang, is noted for its barbecue lamb, or mutton, even though lamb is rarely eaten in other parts of China. In fact, the Mongolian tribes were the ones who introduced lamb to the rest of China. It’s easy to visualize this simple barbecue being prepared by the nomads on the steppes of Xinjiang. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
Xinjiang, which borders Mongolia, is noted for its barbecued lamb even though lamb is rarely eaten in other parts of China. In fact, the Mongolian tribes introduced lamb to the rest of China. This simple barbecue could easily be prepared by the nomads on the plains of Xinjiang. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine. Serious Chinese food geeks may be familiar with Zhangcha duck—a tea-smoked Sichuan delicacy that’s tough to make but impressive as hell to anyone who’s never had it before. This is the recipe Mark Masker used for his experiment.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

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