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Ingredient - Beef

An unusual chili that could also be termed a stew. This is not for beginning chileheads but for the serious aficionado. The name was inspired by the pantywaist heat scales of most other chilis.

W.C. has taken some grief over the turnips and potatoes here, but does he care? In case it’s too hot, serve this with milk or beer.

Beef short ribs are rich, and they make for great winter dishes. Here the short ribs are braised in a caramel sauce spiced with chilies, star anise, and five-spice powder until fork-tender. Green beans are added to the stew and cooked until just tender. The succulent meat and green beans are served over the noodles with some of the braising liquids. If you like, serve Japanese pickled ginger on the side for a delicious counterpoint to the sweet and spicy flavor notes.

The longer it rests, the tastier this dish will be, so braise the ribs the day before you plan to serve them, if possible. I tend to serve less noodles than normal with this hearty dish. The pork butt (shoulder) makes for an equally delicious variation.

This is the universally favorite way to prepare venison. Venison is quite lean yet very flavorful. It makes a wonderful chili that doesn't have a fatty flavor. The slow cooking, chiles, and seasonings tremove any wild taste the meat might have. It freezes beautifully, so double the recipe and freeze a batch for another evening meal. Substitute elk if you wish.

This recipe is by Lois Ellen Frank, from her book Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations (Ten Speed Press, 2002). Both the venison and the juniper berries are available from mail-order sources. Of course, grape juice or wine would not have been available to the Maya, but Lois has adapted this recipe for the modern kitchen.

Here is the traditional way the Sumatrans cook the often-tough meat of the water buffalo--by slowly simmering it in coconut milk.  This recipe takes some time to make, but it's worth it.  It keeps for months in the freezer, so make a lot.  Serve the rendang over rice.

Nowadays it's easy to re-create the chili that Wick used in the first cook-off against H. Allen Smith--just buy some of the famous Wick Fowler 2-Alarm Chili Mix. Or, you can follow the recipe below, which chili legend holds is Wick&rquo;s original version that he cooked in Terlingua in 1967. Remember to remove the Japanese chiles and the chilipiquins before serving. If this chili is too hot, Wick recommended drinking a pint of buttermilk.
This recipe is also attributed to Big Daddy. Since yak meat is impossible to find, substitute buffalo or very lean beef.
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