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Cooking Method - Brine

The most basic brine consists of water and kosher salt, but because the salt solution is absorbed into the fish, it can also be used to carry other flavors with it to enhance the smoked fish. This recipe works well for any fish fillet or whole fish that will be hot-smoked.

Unlike bacon that comes from the pork belly, Canadian bacon (also called back bacon or Irish bacon) is made with trimmed pork loins or tenderloins. It is traditionally wet-cured by injecting the meat with a curing solution. In England this bacon includes the fat portion of the loin. Read more about making bacon in Mike Stines' article here.

Perfect as a snack or a side dish, this pie is usually served topped with salsa. Dedicated chileheads can also add some hot sauce to the mixture.

Chiltepin Sauce

Note that there are hundreds of olive varieties, some might work better than others. Results may vary, so start with small quantities. And as with any produce that you plan to preserve, use only fresh, ripe  and spotless fruit. Read the entire article from Harald Zoschke on the Burn! Blog here.

This basic shellfish brine comes from Mike Stines' article "Smoking Succulent Shellfish". Read more how-to and recipes for smoked mussels, clams, scallops, and oysters here.

 

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