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Cuisine - Caribbean
"Legume" may be the general term for beans, but this stew is a hearty mix of marinated beef and vegetables. All the ingredients can be found at any supermarket, but the combination of habanero chiles, thyme and allspice gives this dish the exotic flavor of the Caribbean. Serve it over mounds of rice or with hunks of crusty bread to mop up the spiced broth. Note: this recipe requires advance preparation.
It’s going to be difficult to find iguana at your local supermarket, so I suggest you substitute fresh tuna or chicken for the reptilian meat. Since the spices and other ingredients are the same as used in Curaçao, you will have rough approximation of the dish. Note: As this recipe cooks, you might have to adjust the consistency with more water or coconut milk.
Here is a classic Jamaican dish that is much beloved in that country. As usual, lamb may be substituted for the goat. Note the West Indian trait of using a massala without chile powder, and then adding chiles to the curry. The dish is traditionally served with white rice, mango chutney, and grated coconut.

Goat is a popular island meat for jerking. Its stronger flavor works well with the rich seasonings of the jerk rub. Read more about Jamaica's Jerk cuisine in the article "Cookin' Jerk on de Barbacoa, Mon!" By Rick Browne


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The "jerk" in jerk pork is a spice mixture that was used to preserve meat before refrigeration. It was developed by the Awarak Indians, and later refined in Jamaica by runaway slaves known as Maroons. These days, the spices are used to season meats for barbecue and to tenderize rather than to preserve. An inexpensive smoker or a covered grill can be substituted for the traditional jerk pit, and is a lot easier than digging a pit in your yard. Note: This recipe required advance preparation.

Note the presence of allspice in this Jamaican version of the pika condiment. Serve over any grilled or roasted meat, fish, or poultry.
Nothing tastes better on a hot day!

This recipe for jerk sauce is fiery but not incendiary, full of flavor, and worth the effort to make it. There are as many Jamaican recipes for jerk as there are Jamaicans; I settled on this as one the best of the best. Serve with big iced bottles of Jamaican Red Stripe beer. Read more about Jamaica's Jerk cuisine in the article"Cookin' Jerk on de Barbacoa, Mon!" By Rick Browne

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