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Chile - Cayenne
From Michael Castleman's The Healing Herbs, this is an alternative to menthol or other warming oils designed to help bruising.
These meatballs fall into a class of tapas called "cosas de picar." Named after the picks that the picadors use during a bull fight, the term refers to those tapas that are served with toothpicks. In Spain, they would be made with minced meat, but since ground meats are more readily available, I use a combination of ground pork and beef. Traditionally these are made with paprika, but since I like my foods a little more spicy, I also add ground cayenne.
This easy sweet-hot glaze, developed by fisherman James Perez (formerly the Home Shore), demonstrates a perfect marriage between fruit and Alaska salmon. Delicious on any cut of salmon, this glaze (enough for 2 pounds of fish) can be used with either grilled or baked fish.

No matter how you spell it—shisk kabob or sis kebabi—this robust specialty features skewered chunks of meat and onions marinated in oil and spices and then grilled over an open flame. The technique apparently originated in the Caucasus and then spread southward to Mediterranean countries. The traditional meat has always been leg of lamb, a meat that seems to be permitted by most major religions. To make a perfect kabob, remove any tough membrane from the meat, cut meat across the grain—and don’t forget that the meat must be marinated before grilling. Serve with a salad of tossed greens, ripe olives, and feta cheese and for dessert, baklava and Turkish coffee.

This year we used about a pound of LC Cayenne pods to cook up a sweet and spicy Thai sauce. Unlike “Louisiana Style” hot sauce, this one is thick, almost like ketchup, and is a lot less vinegary. It is great with grilled shrimp, over rice, for Asian cooking, and even as a dip.

Read Harald Zoschke's entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

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This recipe appeared in the article Chile-Spiced Brunch Ideas for Mother's Day on the Burn! Blog.

To the members of the Madd Momma and The Kid barbecue team, sauce should be a finishing touch and only used during the final stages of barbecuing. In this recipe, they use honey to get the sweet heat they like.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

The Heat of Competition: The Jack Daniels' Championship

 

You can substitute ground piquin, Santaka, or even habanero for the cayenne in this recipe.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Moroccan Tagines

by Nancy Gerlach 

 

Tagines or tajines are wonderfully aromatic North African stews that combine meats, poultry, chicken, or fish with fruits, vegetables and a large variety of spices. The centerpiece of Moroccan meals, there are literally hundreds of traditional tagines as well as many regional variations 

 
Beef Tagine with Green Olives 
This sauce for barbequed poultry and meats originated in North Africa.  It is named after the Berbers, a North African Tribe who were renowned for their great skill as horsemen.  This is great as a marinade and baste for grilled lamb chops.
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