• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Ingredient - Chicken
These wings are a tasty alternative to deep-frying the chicken. They’re great as an appetizer for a summer barbecue. Put them on the grill before guests arrive so that their great aroma greet them as they walk through the door.
The small island of Lombok is the home of this recipe. The word Lombok translates to "spicy chiles" and is the perfect descriptor of the food on this island next to Bali.

Chickens grilled in this manner are very popular throughout Thailand, where they’re sold in bus depots in villages, portable food stations, at the beach—everywhere. The Thais would use bamboo skewers, but metal ones work fine. The skewers keep the chicken flat as it cooks on the grill. You will notice that the chicken is doubly spiced, like American barbecue, but much hotter. Those Thais like their food very pungent! The chiles traditionally used are prik chee fa, with medium-hot, cayenne-like, bright red pods. Serve with sticky rice with mangoes and Thai iced tea.

This recipe from Chef Bill Gragg of the Assets Bar and Grill in Albuquerque, uses dried chipotles, but chipotles en adobo can be substituted if they are rinsed well.

Rex Swank invented this recipe based on Blair's Habanero Chips.
This recipe and others can be found in the article "In Hawaii, Barbecue Means a Luau" by Mike Stines, Ph.B.
recipe image
Since capsaicin breaks up nasal congestion and gives us the "salsa sniffles," try this quick chicken soup cure for your next cold.

Buddy Foster: This recipe is Buddy’s own creation, and he says it came about over 40 years of cooking. The herb mixture gives the chicken a very zesty, fresh flavor, and this is an especially tasty roasted chicken recipe for the spring and summer months, when fresh herbs are plentiful. You can use a whole chicken or pieces. Remember that pieces will cook faster than a whole, so adjust your times accordingly. Buddy’s friend Alan augmented this recipe by throwing one jalapeño into the blender while he was making the sauce, and he cooked the chicken “beer-can” style. Buddy suggests cooking extra; the leftovers are great!

Howlin’ Hollar is a sweet heat whose fire kicks in shortly after the sweet. Read Mark Masker's article about making these spicy drumsticks on the Burn! Blog here.

This recipe and others can be found in the article "In Hawaii, Barbecue Means a Luau" by Mike Stines, Ph.B.

recipe image
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.