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Ingredient - Chile peppers

Believe it or not, this spicy beverage is incredibly refreshing in the Caribbean heat. Samuel swears it will cure the "tequila flu."

This particular version of sangrita, or "little bloody drink," comes
from Chapala, Mexico, where the bartenders have not succumbed to the
temptation of adding tomato juice to this concoction, as the
norteamericanos do. The bloody color comes from the grenadine, so this
is truly a sweet heat drink that is also salty. Some people take a sip
of tequila after each swallow of sangrita, while others mix one part
tequila to four parts sangrita to make a cocktail.

This recipe, a classic Cajun sauce, can be served over grilled Cornish game hens or chicken. It is also great with fried seafood.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Mascarene Chile Cuisine

 

By Dave DeWitt

Use either frozen or fresh blueberries for this compote. You also can adjust the heat by adding fewer chipotles to begin with and then adding more until you reach the desired heat. Chipotles in adobo sauce can be found in the Hispanic section of your supermarket. Serve over pork tenderloin or meat of your choice. This recipe was developed by SuperSite Food Editor Emily DeWitt-Cisneros.From the article Blazing Blueberries.

Where is it written that canned cranberry sauce has to be served with at Thanksgiving? The sweet, sour, hot tastes of this chutney compliments turkey, chicken, and even pork. The addition of black pepper may sound odd, but it does provide a tasty accent to the chutney.

Not all Southwest salsas are tomato-based; this one utilizes tomatillos, 
the small “husk tomatoes” that are grown mostly in Mexico, but are
available fresh or canned in many U.S. supermarkets. The natural
sweetness of the mango blends perfectly with the tartness of the
tomatillos. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This sauce is thought to be of Tunisian origin, but is found throughout all of North Africa and the Middle East under various names and spellings. It is used to flavor couscous and grilled dishes such as brochettes, and also as a relish with salads. Cover this sauce with a thin film of olive oil and it will keep up to a couple of months in the refrigerator.

 

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