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Ingredient - Chile peppers
In Jamaica, this sauce is served over a wide variety of fish and even 
lobster. It is such a tasty sauce that it is wonderful when served over
pasta. The term “rundown” (“oildown” in Barbados and Trinidad) refers to
cooking vegetables in coconut milk until most of the milk is absorbed,
leaving a light oil.

A table condiment to similar to ketchup--but much more pungent--sriracha sauce is named after a seaside town in Thailand. Increasingly popular, this sauce is found on the tables of Thai and Vietnamese restaurants all over North America. Fresh red chiles are the key to the flavor of this recipe.

A table condiment to similar in appearance to ketchup--but much more
pungent--sriracha sauce is named after a seaside town in Thailand.
Increasingly popular, this sauce is found on the tables of Thai and
Vietnamese restaurants all over North America. Fresh red chiles are the
key to the flavor of this recipe.

This recipe, which I found in a 1940s Trinidadian cookbook, is probably 
one of the earliest methods of preserving peppers in the tropics. It is
also called “pepper wine.” The sherry, which gradually picks up heat
from the bird peppers, is sprinkled into soups and stews and makes them
quite exotic. The peppers can be either fresh or dried. It is used as a
condiment and is sprinkled over soups, main dishes, and side dishes.
Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
This recipe was collected in Mombasa, Kenya.  Serve it over grilled or barbecued meats and poultry.
This recipe was collected for me in Mombasa, Kenya by Richard Sterling, 
who wrote: “The barbecue master at the Big Bite Restaurant in Mombasa is
Tsuma Nzole Kalu. He concocted this recipe for hot sauce and gave it its
name. Serve it over grilled or barbecued meats and poultry.”
Mit mit a, an Ethiopian spice mixture, is used to spice up and flavor stews, or w'ets.  It is made from the small and hot African chiles that we know as piquins and is sprinkled over raw meat (kitfo), especially lamb.

This stock is good enough to serve as a first course consommé, in addition to using it as a basis for some of the recipes that follow. Baking or caramelizing the vegetables before adding the water gives an additional richness to the stock. If you wish, adding a 1 to 2 inch piece of kombu seaweed will also add a further depth of flavor. This stock will keep for 2 days, covered, in the refrigerator. It can also be frozen; divide it into 2- or 3-cup freezer containers. Feel free to add any vegetable trimmings from the bag in your freezer, but beware of cabbage or broccoli, whose flavors tend to dominate the stock.

Read Dave DeWitt's article on Veggie Soups for Spring here.

This recipe dates to 1976, when W.C. created it for his first restaurant, the Morning Glory Cafe. It is meatless and dairyless, but "designed for a meat-eater's taste," according to W.C. It is easily frozen or canned.
A we't or wa't is a traditional Ethiopian stew, spiced either with Berbere or this simpler blend of spices.  This spice mixture is usually added near the end of cooking a stew.
 

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