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Meal/Course - Condiment
If you can't find it bottled, make this sauce just before serving. You can control the heat level by adding more or fewer peppers.
This is the latest recipe in Nancy's never ending quest to duplicate that wonderful Caribbean hot sauce that we love. Fresh, frozen, or pickled habaneros can all be used, but if using pickled chiles, there is no need to rinse them. Adjust the heat by adding fewer habaneros, not by increasing the carrots as this can alter the flavor. This version of the recipe is designed to be processed in a water bath.
This tasty clarified butter is a basic ingredient in the preparation of traditional Ethiopian foods.  It is also great spread on breads of any kind.
This is the green chile counterpart to Ethiopian Berbere, but there are some differences.  It's green, it's much milder, and instead of placing it in stews, it's a condiment or dip for breads and meats.

This creamy sauce delivers a double punch, from the horseradish and the chile. Serve it as an accompaniment to grilled salmon, poached fish, prime rib, or even corned beef. Horseradish is very volatile and loses its flavor and aroma quickly, so this sauce should be made just before serving.

This dish was originally designed to cool down very hot curries, but then adventurous cooks had the idea to spice it up! Go figure. Serve this as a condiment.
Here is a quick and easy twist on Louisiana hot sauce. The key here is to use fresh rather than dried chiles. Serve this sauce over fried foods such as fish or alligator.

Horseradish is a root, similar to wasabi, and a member of the mustard family. Prepared horseradish is grated horseradish root combined with distilled vinegar. It has almost no taste until grated when the cells are crushed to release a volatile oil that produces the “heat.”

Use as a topping for soups and noodles, or as a refreshing salad dressing. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator. The sauce will stay fresh for weeks if refrigerated.

This method of making chile sauce differs from others using fresh green New Mexican chiles because these chiles aren't roasted and peeled first, as you must do with green chiles. Because of the high sugar content of fresh red chiles, this sauce is sweeter than most. We harvested some chiles from his garden one late summer day, made a batch of this sauce, and ate every drop as a soup! It makes a tasty enchilada sauce, too. It will keep for about a week in the refrigerator.
 

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