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Meal/Course - Dessert
There's nothing like a spiced cider to get you ready to beg for candy. If you can find hard cider, you can eliminate the brandy here; if not, use non-alcoholic cider plus the brandy. Serve with a cinnamon stick in each cup if you want.
I'm no baker, but even I can make this!
I just happened to have a bunch of baby bananas sitting on the counter one day when inspiration struck and now these are my absolute favorite tamales. The fun part is watching your guest's faces when they dig into the tamale and find a whole banana inside. Wrapping the tamales in banana leaves gives more flavor, but use corn husks if that's all you have.

These are so easy, it’s almost a non-recipe. Sure, you can complicate matters by making your own dough and cooking bacon from scratch, but for pure instant gratification, this is the way to go. And since we’re celebrating International Bacon Day—a holiday conceived by college students, I believe instant gratification is in keeping with the true spirit of the day.

"Do not let the pleasant taste fool you," warns Anne Marie, "it carries the kick of a mule!" She continues, "In case you drink up your supply and in your liquorized state find that you are having difficulty with the formula, this clever little rhyme will help you:

One of sour,

Two of sweet,

Three of strong,

And four of weak.

 

Believe it or not, the macadamia nut tree was first grown only for ornamental purposes. Thankfully, someone experimented with the nuts and discovered their butter-like, slightly sweet nature. This bread is so rich you won’t need to butter it.

This recipe appeared in the article Chile-Spiced Brunch Ideas for Mother's Day on the Burn! Blog.

First we’ll start off with good old American apple pie. This recipe can be whipped up at the last minute, as can most of these BBQ desserts, and gives you a delicious pie that tastes like Grandma made it. If the crust is charred along the edges, who cares? It’s barbecue, man. Oh yes, my grandma lived in Canada…hence the addition of cheese to the pie. Try it, you’ll love it.

recipe image
This candy recipe makes good use of the syrup created as a byproduct when making candied chiles. Depending on the chiles used, the syrup can get pretty hot. Typically it has a consistency somewhere between corn syrup and molasses and looks clear, lightly tinted.
Although history doesn’t reveal the origin of these cookies, it’s believed that they were created by the descendants of the early Spanish settlers in New Mexico. Traditionally they are served at the holiday season and can be found gracing tables after the lighting of the luminaries on Christmas Eve. They are so popular that they have been declared the Official State Cookie. New Mexico is probably the only state that has one! These flaky cookies with a hint of anise must be prepared with lard for the traditional taste, although shortening can be substituted.
I like to use blue corn in this recipe because of its nutty taste. But if you don’t have blue corn available, substitute yellow cornmeal. They will still be just as good. Another tasty variation is to add crumbled bacon to the mix. Normally I use 4 chopped jalapenos but I substituted the jalapeno pulp for this experiment. Serve these in place of cornbread with barbecues, picnics, or even as a breakfast muffin.
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