• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Meal/Course - Dessert
This crunchy candy puts a hot new twist on a traditional brittles. Be very careful when removing the candy from the microwave because it will be very, very hot. The times given here are approximate and can vary because of the power differences of the ovens, so be sure to monitor the candy closely.
This recipe and others can be found in the article "In Hawaii, Barbecue Means a Luau" by Mike Stines, Ph.B.

recipe image

Peaches are the leading deciduous fruit crop grown in Texas and it is estimated that there are more than one million trees planted statewide. Average annual production exceeds one million bushels.  Some of the best peaches I’ve ever eaten are grown in the Hill Country outside of Austin and San Antonio.  They are so important there that a Hill Country Fruit Council has been established to guide tourists to the best orchards.  Here’s how to use them in a wonderful dessert. From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

Central Texas is Hill Country, which produces the habaneros, pecans, and peaches that are used in this recipe. This cooked salsa is an example of the New Southwestern style of cooking, and it would accompany grilled chicken or fish. From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

Here’s a perfect holiday dessert. Serve with coffee laced with Jack Daniel’s or hot chocolate.

This citrus delight is simple to prepare and and just tart enough to complement the sweet-hot glaze. It is also nice when made in a bundt pan. Read more spicy holiday cake recipes by Dave DeWitt here.

This refreshing drink originated in India, where it is often served for dessert after a meal of fiery hot curries. Fruits such as pineapple, strawberries, peaches, or pineapples may be added to or substituted for the mango.
Mangos and coconut milk are meant for each other, and sticky rice is the icing on the cake. Try to get yellow-skinned "Manila" mangos if you can—the flavor is stronger and more acidic than the green and red-skinned South American varieties.

Most pumpkin pies use canned solid-packed pumpkin, which gives the end product that nice smoothness we’ve all come to appreciate. The flesh you scrape out of a large pumpkin is more akin to wet pasta than what you find in a can. No one likes runny pumpkin pie. Luckily, my friend Sam had some experience dealing with scavenged pumpkin meat. On his advice, I strained the pumpkin through some cheese cloth and let it dry until it was damp but not wet, then pureed it until I had the 2 cups called for in the recipe.

You can read the entire article by Mark Masker on the Burn! Blog here.

This microwave version of peanut brittle is easier to prepare than most, but be sure to use a large bowl to keep the mixture from boiling over as the volume increases. The green chile heat is a nice complement to the sweet brittle.
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.