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Meal/Course - Dessert
Thanks to Jeff Gerlach for this great basic ice cream recipe, to which we have added mulberries as the fruit of choice. You will need an ice cream maker for this one, but the result is worth it. Note that mulberries are naturally sweet, so you may want to taste them to determine how much sugar to add, if any. This is a very forgiving recipe, so feel free to improvise. Warning: All of the tongues of the diners will be stained purple.

In Papiamentu, the Creole dialect, musik di zumbi is "spirit music," a combination of African rhythms, reggae, and South American music. This cocktail will get you into the spirit, alright!

In Hungary, this dish is served over toasted bread or rolls, or accompanied by dumplings or plain rice. It can also be a rich side dish to accompany roasted chicken or pork. To save preparation time, slice the mushrooms with an egg slicer.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. So named because the halved peaches resemble flowers, this dessert is a classic from the '50s.  It can be served with ice cream or whipped cream.

The word chutney comes from the Sanskrit word chatni, and in India, refers to relishes that are used to accent other dishes. They can be sweet, sour, hot, or mild. This is a hot and sweet version.  Serve with curries or other Indian foods.

From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

The deliciously fruity salsa can be kept in the refrigerator for a few days, but fresh it's just best. Tip: For a killer tropical seafood sauce, simmer the salsa in a small saucepan with about 1/2 cup of Chardonnay for 10 minutes, then puree it.
This recipe combines two of my favorites—chile and popcorn. Adjust the heat of this candy by the type of chile you use. Make with New Mexican for a mild heat, cayenne for more fire and chile de arbol for somewhere in between. Don’t use microwave popcorn because of its salt and fat content.

Making your own phyllo can be a time consuming project, but fortunately the dough you can purchase ready-made works equally well in this recipe. The filling can be pureed or left with some texture. If you do puree the filling, do it before adding nuts and eliminate the raisins. These little packages can also be dusted with powdered sugar before serving. The trick to working with phyllo is to work very quickly and to keep the dough covered when not using so that it does not dry out.

With the native chile and piñon nuts, it's not surprising that this is one of New Mexico's favorite candies.

This recipe is courtesy of Rick Browne. Read more about favorite Superbowl Party dishes from chefs on the Burn! Blog here.

 

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