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Meal/Course - Dinner

Chicos are dried roasted corn kernels and are also the name of a very popular dish in Northern New Mexico. Traditionally, the corn is dried in the hornos or Indian ovens, which gives it a smoky taste. Today, however, most of the chicos are dried in commercial ovens and lack the distinctive taste.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:
 
The chutney is a nice and spicy accompaniment to the creamy taste of the scallops. We love habanero chiles in it, but use a serrano for less heat and a slightly different flavor. If you don’t have fresh coconut, substitute 1 ½ cups flaked coconut. Serve with lemon rice pilaf and grilled mango slices.
This is one of the most delicious Mexican coastal fish recipes. It is served in Veracruz, the area of Mexico most influenced by Spanish cooking, but is popular all over the country. Often the snapper is dusted with flour and pan fried, then covered with a sauce, but we prefer ours beach-style. We grill it over wood or natural charcoal (gas is acceptable, too) and then serve it with the sauce on the side. Charring the tomatoes on the grill adds a smoky dimension to the sauce. This elegant and colorful fish is served with white rice and additional pickled jalapeños.
With 2,600 miles of coastline providing an abundance of seafood, it’s no wonder that Chileans consume more seafood that any of the other South American countries. Not all of the fish used in seviche is cubed, as evidenced by this popular recipe that calls for fish fillets. The bitter orange juice is from the Sevilla oranges that brought by the Spaniards and are so popular in this part of the world. This is a mild seviche which is usually garnished with hot sauce to bring up the heat. I like to use a Caribbean habanero-based because they compliment fruit, such as the grapefruits used here.
All fresh green New Mexican chiles are great for stuffing, but we prefer Big Jims because they are so large. Fresh poblano chiles (a Mexican favorite) and even large jalapeños can also be used. Top the rellenos with either a red or green chile sauce before serving.
Chiles rellenos literally means "stuffed chiles," and in Mexico many different chiles are used, including poblanos, jalapeños, rocotos, and even fresh pasillas. Here in the Southwest, we prefer New Mexican green chiles. Whatever type of chile you use, the preparation and fillings are the same.
Chili historian Everett Lee DeGolyer was the owner of The Saturday Review of Literature, and was also, according to H. Allen Smith, "a world traveler, a gourmet, and the Solomon of the chili bowl." Here is the historian's recipe in his own words.
From the famous iconoclast and author of The Great Chili Confrontation, here's the recipe that infuriated Texans after it was published in Holiday Magazine in 1967. Smith had the gall to title his article "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do." Once again, the directions are in Smith's own words.
Here, as best I could reconstruct it, is the chile encrusted pork loin as served at De La Tierra. It is served with a "Barbecue Demi Glace" but they forgot to give me the recipe. So just make a gravy with the pan drippings and add some sherry and a little of your favorite barbecue sauce. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.
 

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