• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Difficulty - Easy

The first food I prepared with a salt block was a Szechuan citrus scallop and shrimp appetizer (this could also be an entrée if you increase the number of shrimp and scallops per serving). Following the manufacturer’s recommendations I placed the dry, room temperature salt block on an unheated grill and turned the grill on to its lowest temperature allowing the salt block to warm (this also removes any moisture that might be on the block). Then I slowly increased the grill’s temperature until the salt block reached the desired temperature… for me the process took about 45 minutes until the block reached 550 degrees F. The key is to slowly increase the temperature, otherwise the block may shatter.

Once the block is at the desired temperature, add the food and cook until done. For the shrimp and scallops, it only took about two or three minutes per side until they were done.

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine. Serious Chinese food geeks may be familiar with Zhangcha duck—a tea-smoked Sichuan delicacy that’s tough to make but impressive as hell to anyone who’s never had it before. This is the recipe Mark Masker used for his rib experiment.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

Rick Browne, Ph.B., host of the PBS show “Barbecue America” and the author of The Best Barbecue on Earth and nine other books, is supplying articles and recipes to the Fiery Foods & Barbecue SuperSite.
recipe image
When you order "green sauce" in Texas, this is what you will be served. 
It differs from New Mexico's green sauce in that the color is derived
from tomatillos rather than from green chiles. This sauce can be used as
a dipping sauce, with enchiladas, or as a topping for grilled poultry or
fish.
My friend Richard Sterling developed this recipe, which is his version 
of how the Spaniards transformed Montezuma’s favorite spicy beverage
with the addition of alcohol. He commented: "Salud! Drink to the Old
World and the New."

Denny Morrison is a Canadian champion long-track speed skater with an Olympic gold medal to his credit. His second passion? Grilling. His food of choice: burgers. You can read the full story at the link above, or check out his favorite burger recipe here:

Named from ahuacatl "testicle" and mole, meaning “mixture,” this pulpy sauce moved from strictly Mexican use into America around 1900 and slowly increased in popularity as the avocado became more available in American supermarkets.  It really took off after the introduction of corn chips in the 1960s and now is found pre-made in various packages everywhere, but many of them are bland and lack the full flavor of guacamole made from scratch.  This version is traditionally made with a molcajete y mano, a large Mexican mortar and pestle carved from volcanic rock. If you don't have a molcajete y mano, you can smash the avocados with a fork or potato masher. From the article Avocado Madness!

For as simple as this rub is, it goes great with red meat, especially tri-tip.

This recipe was collected for me in Mombasa, Kenya by Richard Sterling, 
who wrote: “The barbecue master at the Big Bite Restaurant in Mombasa is
Tsuma Nzole Kalu. He concocted this recipe for hot sauce and gave it its
name. Serve it over grilled or barbecued meats and poultry.”
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2015, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.