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Difficulty - Easy
When you order "green sauce" in Texas, this is what you will be served. 
It differs from New Mexico's green sauce in that the color is derived
from tomatillos rather than from green chiles. This sauce can be used as
a dipping sauce, with enchiladas, or as a topping for grilled poultry or
fish.
My friend Richard Sterling developed this recipe, which is his version 
of how the Spaniards transformed Montezuma’s favorite spicy beverage
with the addition of alcohol. He commented: "Salud! Drink to the Old
World and the New."

Denny Morrison is a Canadian champion long-track speed skater with an Olympic gold medal to his credit. His second passion? Grilling. His food of choice: burgers. You can read the full story at the link above, or check out his favorite burger recipe here:

Named from ahuacatl "testicle" and mole, meaning “mixture,” this pulpy sauce moved from strictly Mexican use into America around 1900 and slowly increased in popularity as the avocado became more available in American supermarkets.  It really took off after the introduction of corn chips in the 1960s and now is found pre-made in various packages everywhere, but many of them are bland and lack the full flavor of guacamole made from scratch.  This version is traditionally made with a molcajete y mano, a large Mexican mortar and pestle carved from volcanic rock. If you don't have a molcajete y mano, you can smash the avocados with a fork or potato masher. From the article Avocado Madness!

For as simple as this rub is, it goes great with red meat, especially tri-tip.

This recipe was collected for me in Mombasa, Kenya by Richard Sterling, 
who wrote: “The barbecue master at the Big Bite Restaurant in Mombasa is
Tsuma Nzole Kalu. He concocted this recipe for hot sauce and gave it its
name. Serve it over grilled or barbecued meats and poultry.”
This thick and delicious soup from North Africa should be served as a supper dish, which is when many thick, spicy soups are traditionally served.  Even though 10 cloves of garlic sounds like a lot, the garlic mellows as it cooks.  Serve it with crusty warm bread.

There are over 30 varieties of Turkish kebabs which locals call “siskebabi,” “sis kebaps,” or “kebabi. Fish, vegetables, pork, beef, fruit, or fowl, are all put on wood or metal skewers and grilled over open flame or coals. Note: If you want to grill vegetables along with fish, chicken or small cubes of meat it’s best to parboil vegetables such as bell peppers, zucchini, carrots and other dense foods before skewering. Baby new potatoes can be scrubbed and par-boiled in skins or use canned whole potatoes. This recipe is courtesy of Rick Browne. Read more about favorite Superbowl Party dishes from chefs on the Burn! Blog here.

This recipe hails from Algeria, where it is a popular appetizer.  Note the use of paprika here -- it was introduced form Hungary via Spain.
 

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