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Difficulty - Easy
This all-purpose sauce recipe is from the southern part of New Mexico, 
where green chile is the one of the state's top food crops and is used
more commonly than the red form. It is a great topping for enchiladas
and is often served over scrambled eggs. Variations: To thicken the
sauce, make a roux by sauteing 1 tablespoon flour in 1 tablespoon
vegetable oil, taking care not to let it burn. Slowly stir the roux into
the sauce and cook to the desired thickness. Coriander and Mexican
oregano may be added to taste. For added heat, add more New Mexican
chiles or a serrano or two.
This slightly crazy, alcohol-charged tropical drink is perfect for a Hot 
Luck party. Remember to serve only one of these per guest per hour.

This summer soup is delicious cold or hot. While this recipe makes four servings, each just under one cup, you may want to double it, either to accommodate more people or larger appetites. From the article Avocado Madness!

This dish from Ghana is delicious and easy to make.  The hot chilies are countered by the tomatoes and the crab.  Serve this dish with hot, cooked rice.

Cool the heat from your chile-spiked dish with a slice of this rich cheesecake. Fresh pomegranates in the topping make this a beautiful, unforgettable dessert. Recipe courtesy of Pomegranates.org, where you’ll find many more recipes featuring pomegranates.

Horseradish is a classic condiment that’s served with roast meats—beef 
in particular—and cooked or raw vegetables. Since horseradish is very
volatile (the active ingredient is isothiocyanate) and loses its flavor
and aroma quickly, this simple sauce should be made close to serving
time. For an added hit of chile heat, I sometimes add ground habanero chile.

Rick Browne, Ph.B., host of the PBS show “Barbecue America” and the author of The Best Barbecue on Earth and nine other books, is supplying articles and recipes to the Fiery Foods& Barbecue SuperSite.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 

Flypaper & Foie Gras
A Tale of Two Barbecue Restaurants 

 

By Rick Browne, PH.B. 

  

recipe image

"The second item I prepared was classic Thai street food: Crying Tiger Beef. But instead of cooking a whole piece of marinated skirt steak (the traditional method), I bias-sliced a partially frozen steak and marinated the sliced beef. When the block was screaming hot, I quickly seared the steak strips to medium-rare, about two to three minutes per side. (The longer food stays on the block and the higher the food’s moisture content the more salt it will pick up from the block.) To accompany the steak, I grilled marinated asparagus on the salt block until crisp-tender and served it with Jasmine rice."


Read the entire article on salt block cooking by Mike Stines here.



This is yet another variation of the classic and popular dish, black beans and rice or "Moors and Christians." The recipe gets its name from the black of the beans and white of the rice. Not only a great entree, it can also be used as a filling for tacos and for burritos. Red kidney beans can be substituted in the recipe for a slightly different taste.

This recipe is from Tanzania, East Africa.  Even though soups and stews are common throughout Africa, this recipe shows the Indian influence with the addition of curry.
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



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