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Ingredient - Fruit
This refreshing drink originated in India, where it is often served for dessert after a meal of fiery hot curries. Fruits such as pineapple, strawberries, peaches, or pineapples may be added to or substituted for the mango.

Albuquerque-area resident and vegetarian cookbook author Nanette Blanchard has self-published a booklet of her favorite southwestern plant-based recipes. Fiesta Vegan: 30 Delicious Recipes from New Mexico contains her take on traditional recipes such as Posole, Calabacitas, Sangria, and Capirotada. Each of the recipes includes a color photo and a nutritional analysis. Fiesta Vegan also offers a list of online sources for specialty ingredients and recommendations for New Mexico stops for food-lovers. The 40 page booklet is available either in print or as a .PDF download. You can also find a Kindle version without photos; information on all the booklet versions is on her web site here. Blanchard also maintains a food blog, Cooking in Color.

Mangos and coconut milk are meant for each other, and sticky rice is the icing on the cake. Try to get yellow-skinned "Manila" mangos if you can—the flavor is stronger and more acidic than the green and red-skinned South American varieties.

One evening at Marie Permenter's house in Trinidad, with Scotch-and-coconut water cocktails in hand, Mary Jane and I began discussing the versatility of mangos. Marie dashed into the kitchen and proceeded to whip up the following chutney for us to taste. Because of the ingredients, one would think that the taste is overwhelming. But quite the contrary; it is delicate and can be used as a dip for chips (plantain chips work well), vegetables, or crackers. Spanish thyme is also known as Indian borage (Coleus amboinicus), and Cuban oregano. Its origin is unknown, but it is grown as a fresh herb in many parts of the Caribbean. From the article Mango Madness!

Thanks to Jeff Gerlach for this great basic ice cream recipe, to which we have added mulberries as the fruit of choice. You will need an ice cream maker for this one, but the result is worth it. Note that mulberries are naturally sweet, so you may want to taste them to determine how much sugar to add, if any. This is a very forgiving recipe, so feel free to improvise. Warning: All of the tongues of the diners will be stained purple.

In Papiamentu, the Creole dialect, musik di zumbi is "spirit music," a combination of African rhythms, reggae, and South American music. This cocktail will get you into the spirit, alright!

Here’s another option for cooking with PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur. The recipe also calls for pomegranate molasses (also called pomegranate syrup), which can be purchased online at The Spice House.

This recipe features PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur in a tasty glaze for salmon. For more recipes, visit www.pamaliqueur.com.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. So named because the halved peaches resemble flowers, this dessert is a classic from the '50s.  It can be served with ice cream or whipped cream.

The word chutney comes from the Sanskrit word chatni, and in India, refers to relishes that are used to accent other dishes. They can be sweet, sour, hot, or mild. This is a hot and sweet version.  Serve with curries or other Indian foods.

From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

 

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