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Cooking Method - Grill

"The second item I prepared was classic Thai street food: Crying Tiger Beef. But instead of cooking a whole piece of marinated skirt steak (the traditional method), I bias-sliced a partially frozen steak and marinated the sliced beef. When the block was screaming hot, I quickly seared the steak strips to medium-rare, about two to three minutes per side. (The longer food stays on the block and the higher the food’s moisture content the more salt it will pick up from the block.) To accompany the steak, I grilled marinated asparagus on the salt block until crisp-tender and served it with Jasmine rice."


Read the entire article on salt block cooking by Mike Stines here.


Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

Most barbecue cooks have their favorite dry rub recipe. This one is from the National Pork Producers Council. It calls for rinsing the rub off the ribs before cooking, a technique some cooks might choose not to use. The ribs can be rubbed and kept refrigerated for up to two days.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

The Heat of Competition: The Jack Daniels' Championship

 

Danielle Dimovski, known in barbeque circles as Diva Q, is a bright star of ‘Que from the frozen white north.

Falafel, an ancient vegetarian dish dating from the time of the Pharaohs, is usually fried, but we have figured out a way to grill it. Both Egypt and Israel claim falafel as their national dish, so we have an Israel-style salsa to serve with it. Sabra is a colloquialism for people born in Israel (as opposed to immigrants), yet the salsa has two non-native ingredients that are now grown in abundance in Israel: avocados and jalapeños. Serve with a tomato and cucumber salad.

This recipe is from Ronald Lewis Buchholz whohails from Fitchburg, Wisconsin, by way of Milwaukee, and the ingredients in this smoked stuffed jalapeño recipe reflect his heritage and some of his favorite foods. It makes creative use of an empty dozen-count cardboard (not Styrofoam) egg carton with the lid cut off. For a smoky flavor, put ¼ cup unsoaked hardwood chips on the fire before covering the grill.

Don't wait for a party to serve this spicy shrimp. After grilling the shrimp, simmer the marinade for 15 minutes and add a small amount of cornstarch to thicken. Serve the shrimp with the sauce over rice for a terrific entree.
Gorgeous insists that his sauce is secret, but if he wanted to keep it that way, he should never have told me the ingredients. We experimented in Dave’s and Mary Jane’s kitchen until we got the sauce right. It can also be used on chicken. It is a grill sauce, designed to be brushed on during the grilling process, but it has a lot of sugar in it, so take care that it does not burn. The sauce yield is about 1 cup.
This dish originates from Africa but was adopted by the Portuguese and is now one of their main dishes served in restaurants, cafés, and bars. It is a simple but tasty dish, and is a fond memory for me. The dish is usually served with crisp hot french fries, but you could serve boiled new potatoes if you prefer. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
 

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