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Chile - Habanero
Eggs play an important role in the cuisine of Yucatán, especially hard-cooked eggs, which are a major ingredient in many popular recipes. Very unique to the Yucatán, these enchiladas are traditionally served garnished with a green oil that is squeezed from toasted pumpkin seeds, but they taste good with or without it. This is a very old Mayan recipe originally made with turkey eggs and it has reputed to have been served to served to the Spaniards when they arrived in the New World. After the Spaniards arrived, chickens and their eggs replaced turkeys in popularity.
This is the latest recipe in Nancy's never ending quest to duplicate that wonderful Caribbean hot sauce that we love. Fresh, frozen, or pickled habaneros can all be used, but if using pickled chiles, there is no need to rinse them. Adjust the heat by adding fewer habaneros, not by increasing the carrots as this can alter the flavor. This version of the recipe is designed to be processed in a water bath.

This creamy sauce delivers a double punch, from the horseradish and the chile. Serve it as an accompaniment to grilled salmon, poached fish, prime rib, or even corned beef. Horseradish is very volatile and loses its flavor and aroma quickly, so this sauce should be made just before serving.

For some reason, habanero chiles work particularly well with fruits. 
These daiquiris will delight chileheads, who will probably suggest
adding more habanero to the blender! For a non-alcoholic version of this
drink, substitute pineapple juice for the rum and decrease the sugar to
3 tablespoons. From the article Perfectly Pungent Peaches by Dave DeWitt here.
Serve these caramelized onions in place of the creamed ones that grace many holiday tables. These too are sweet, but also hot and lower in fat and won’t fill you up! Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

Here is a typical Bahamian fried chicken recipe that varies only slightly from island to island, and there are hundreds of islands. Serve with potato salad and a rum punch

Gorditas means "little fat ones" and are thick, fried, tortillas that are stuffed with any number of fillings--beef, chicken, pork or beans. Cabbage may seem like an odd garnish but it is very popular topping in Mexico where it holds up better than lettuce in the heat. The use of black beans reflects a Yucatacan influence, so I serve them with a habanero-based sauce.

Here is a tropical change from the usual celery seed coleslaw. Allow the dressing to sit as long as possible to build up the heat. From the article Mango Madness!

For this recipe, use a good quality imported curry powder; the domestic curry powders just don't have the taste or the punch needed for this recipe. Serve this dish with rice and peas or fried plantains or cooked yams.

The sausage for this recipe is from Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing appeared as part of the article"Grindhouse: Pasilla Peppers with Habanero Chorizo Stuffing" by Mark Masker. He tweaked it a bit with the addition of habanero peppers. Read the entire article here.

 

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