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Cuisine - Italian
All this dish needs is a fresh salad and you've got a meal!
Pizza for breakfast-why not? After all, Italians love cold pizza with hot cappuccino for breakfast. But rather than cold pepperoni, I&rquo;m proposing a hearty and hot breakfast pie. Use frozen prepared dough and hash browns for easy, quick assembly.
Sweet heat is popular in southern Italy, as evidenced by this tart, which is a specialty of the Sabbia d' Oro restaurant of the Calabrian province of Cosenza (see also here). Chile jam is readily available from mail order sources.

Note that there are hundreds of olive varieties, some might work better than others. Results may vary, so start with small quantities. And as with any produce that you plan to preserve, use only fresh, ripe  and spotless fruit. Read the entire article from Harald Zoschke on the Burn! Blog here.

Of all the spicy Calabrian dishes, this one is probably the best known. Feel free to increase the heat scale by adding more peperoncini.
I first sampled the easy way that Italians cook their pasta when I was fortunate enough to house sit for friends in Florence, Italy. When they would prepare a simple dinner, they would pick some herbs, dice a fresh tomato, combine them with some olive oil and butter. Sometimes they would heat the mixture and sometimes not, and toss it with pasta. Since I’m addicted to chile, I always add it to their basic recipe. In fact it, this is so easy to prepare it can hardly be called a recipe

From the book Il Gelato Secondo Matteo, by Carlo Correra.

This Southwestern adaptation of the Italian specialty uses green chile and spinach in place of the traditional basil in the pesto. It has a very concentrated flavor—as do all pestos, so a little bit goes a long way. This pasta topper is also good on grilled meats or fish, burgers, and sandwiches.

Of course we have our own New Mexican version of pesto! It’s a topping for pasta but also can be added to soups, stews, and rice. Although we have specified cilantro in this recipes, you can use the traditional basil or even Italian parsley. Pecans, another New Mexican crop, can be substituted for the piñon nuts.

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