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Chile - Jalapeño
This recipe is from my new cookbook, Cilantro Secrets, published in June, 2006 by Rio Nuevo. For this version, I've added some jalapeno for an extra kick. Buffalo meat is very lean, and it benefits from the rich flavor of this pumpkin seed (pepita) pesto. You can use any leftover pesto on black beans or nachos, or tossed with pasta. And yes, you can use store-bought pesto if you must.

Pomegranates go with green chile too, as demonstrated in this tasty twist on fresh avocado salad. This recipe (and many others) can be found on the "official" pomegranate industry website, www.pomegranates.org, along with the answers to deep existential questions such as "can you eat the seeds?"

When the aroma of this dish rises up from the cooking fire, it tantalizes the nostrils. For the best results, use a mortar and pestle to combine the ingredients but if you lack such simple tools, use a blender. We thank our friend Richard Sterling for this Cambodian recipe, gathered on one of his extensive Southeast Asian trips.
These slivered reddish gems are the perfect addition to every Mexican meal. Ophelia’s have the best flavor and crunch, and, though cebollas are intended to be condiments, her guests often find it difficult not to pile their tortillas full. Add slivered chiles, a little or a lot, for some heat.

This recipe comes from our friend, Loretta Salazar, who lived in Ecuador while she attended the university on an exchange program. The popcorn that is served on top of the ceviche is an American approximation probably of the toasted corn, or cancha, that is served over Peruvian ceviches. This ceviche is a quick one, if you use precooked, frozen mini-shrimp. Serve the ceviche on a bed of bibb lettuce, garnished with black olives, sliced hard boiled egg, feta cheese, a slice of cooked corn on the cob, and maybe some crusty bread for a very appetizing luncheon or light dinner.

Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This spicy ceviche from the southern Mexican state of Chiapas can be served on fresh greens for lunch or for a light dinner, accompanied by warm tortillas. Any of the fish substitutions will work equally as well in this dish. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation..

This is a basic Mexican version of ceviche that is easily varied with the addition of fruits and vegetables that are in season. I like to add diced avocado, or jicama, or even cucumbers to add not only different flavors but also textures to the ceviche. By adding tomato juice and pulp to the recipe and serving in a large parfait glass, you transform the ceviche into the very popular, seafood cockteles found all over Mexico.
This chili is from the C.I.A.—the Culinary Institute of America, where Chef Jim Heywood teaches. He competed in fifteen chili cook-offs in 1992. "I&rquo;ve won a few along the way," he notes, "including the Connecticut State Championship in 1988 and the New Hampshire State Championship in 1991. Jim is also one of the star guest chefs at the National Fiery-Foods & Barbecue Shows in Albuquerque.

This fiery shrimp appetizer recipe by Mike Stines appeared in the Burn! Blog here. Serve the shrimp with Baja Gazpacho for an unforgettable shrimp cocktail or just enjoy them straight off the grill.

recipe image
Note: This recipe requires advance preparation
 

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