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Meal/Course - Lunch

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 Oodles and Oodles of Asian Noodles

by Nancy Gerlach, Fiery-Foods.com Food Editor Emeritus 

"Mixed Grill. Cut fruit of choice in half, remove core and seeds or pits, and arrange in a hinged grill. Squeeze a lemon over the surfaces; sprinkle with sugar and a dash of ground cinnamon and grill quickly until just hot. Brush with melted butter. Sprinkle a little brandy or sweet liqueur over all." –Maggie Waldron
Thanks to Patrick Hancock, executive chef at El Pinto Restaurant for the concept for the sauce recipe. For the chicken, I used The Old Spice Shack’s Country French Rub, and it was delicious. Note that the sauce can be pureed or not, and that it is the most brilliant purple color that you will ever see.
This recipe and others can be found in the following article:
 
This is one of the most delicious Mexican coastal fish recipes. It is served in Veracruz, the area of Mexico most influenced by Spanish cooking, but is popular all over the country. Often the snapper is dusted with flour and pan fried, then covered with a sauce, but we prefer ours beach-style. We grill it over wood or natural charcoal (gas is acceptable, too) and then serve it with the sauce on the side. Charring the tomatoes on the grill adds a smoky dimension to the sauce. This elegant and colorful fish is served with white rice and additional pickled jalapeños.
With 2,600 miles of coastline providing an abundance of seafood, it’s no wonder that Chileans consume more seafood that any of the other South American countries. Not all of the fish used in seviche is cubed, as evidenced by this popular recipe that calls for fish fillets. The bitter orange juice is from the Sevilla oranges that brought by the Spaniards and are so popular in this part of the world. This is a mild seviche which is usually garnished with hot sauce to bring up the heat. I like to use a Caribbean habanero-based because they compliment fruit, such as the grapefruits used here.
Hot and slightly sweet describes this recipe.  Serve it with plain white rice. Eating the red chile pod pieces is not recommended.
The basic recipe for Cincinnati chili is much like others containing beef, onions, and chili powder, but that’s where the similarity ends. Cinnamon and a variety of spices such as cloves, ginger, and allspice are also added to make this very unique chili. You order the chili by which "way" you like it—2-Way is chili over spaghetti, 3-Way with cheese added, 4-Way adds onions, and 5-Way is the works: spaghetti, chili, beans, onions, and cheese. No matter what "Way" you order the chile, it’s always served with oyster crackers.

Freelance chef Alejandra Montero created this recipe that was distributed by the Hortus Botanicus. It is usually served with rice that is fried in oil and garlic before it is cooked.

Alejandra suggests adding a half cup of fresh or frozen garden peas during the last 5 minutes.

This recipe is from Fofo Voltaire of Caribbean Temptation, Inc.
 

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