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Meal/Course - Lunch

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Making Thailand's "Chile Water"

Story and Photos by Austin Bush

 

Nam phrik kapi is probably the most well known nam phrik in Thailand. As the name suggests, it is made with kapi, a salted and fermented paste of fine shrimp known as khoei and is always served with fresh and/or parboiled vegetables, as well as egg-battered deep-fried vegetables, as described below. The amount of ingredients listed below for the nam phrik are largely for reference; a Thai chef would virtually never use measuring instruments to cook, and a dish is usually made to taste, keeping in mind a desired balance of the four tastes: sour, spicy, salty and sweet. 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Making Thailand's "Chile Water"

Story and Photos by Austin Bush

 

This is another northern style curry that has become popular among people all over Thailand. The main ingredient is phrik num, long slender green chiles that are almost exclusively used in this particular dish. Use whatever kind of skinny green chiles you can find. Depending on the chiles used, the nam phrik can range from mild to mouth-searingly hot.  

These wings are not a traditional New Mexican dish, but since it’s one of our favorites, and we serve it in New Mexico, we have dared to adopt it as one of our hot and spicy favorites. Because of the high sugar content in the sauce, use it toward the end of grilling so it doesn’t burn.

This particular ceviche is spicy because the addition of a fair amount of crushed ajís or whatever dried chiles you have available. The use of corn and sweet potatoes signal this dish as being very typically Peruvian. Serve it as an entree for lunch or dinner on those hot and sweltering days of summer. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This is the method used by chef Anthony Tuttle at the Marriott Phuket Resort and Spa’s cooking school to prepare those delicious prawns. Serve the prawns with jasmine rice.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Bugged Out in Thailand!

By Paul Ross

This is Mexico’s answer to the grilled cheese sandwich! They are most delicious made with the rich, stringy cheese from Chihuahua made by the Mennonites, but lacking that, any good melting cheese such as mozzarella, string or even Monterey Jack are good substitutes. Quesadillas can be made with either corn or flour tortillas and the tortillas can be folded in half over the filling, or stacked with the filling in between. Cheese isn’t the only food you can use, I use what is on hand in my refrigerator. Just remember you are only toasting the quesadilla until the cheese melts so any filling needs to be cooked before using.
These are some of the most common tamales in the Southwest. They can be found in restaurants, cafes and in the coolers toted by strolling vendors. Everybody loves them, so make a bunch and freeze any leftovers. This recipe makes enough pork filling to make another batch of tamales, but you can always just use the extra pork for burritos.

This recipe and others can be found in the 12-part illustrated series "A World of Curries". You can read all about this unique Indian flavor here.

 

 

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