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Meal/Course - Main Course
No project on chili con carne would be complete with out a recipe from a guy from Texas named Bubba. This wonderful recipe requires 3 hours cooking time and a bit of Texas magic!

Use a very sharp boning knife and remove the T-shaped bone from the pork shoulder and any extraneous fat (or ask your butcher to do it for you). For this shoulder the trim weight came to about three pounds. Butterfly the shoulder to a three-inch thickness. Apply the cure on all the surfaces of the butterflied pork using 4 1/4 teaspoons per pound of trimmed meat.

Created by Bruce Hiebert, owner of eastern Washington’s Patit Creek Restaurant, this mild, celery-based sauce fits Alaska salmon perfectly. It is famous in Cordova, Alaska where it was used by the Copper River

Fishermen’s Co-op at its annual barbecue. A long simmer time gives the sauce its melting flavor and smooth consistency, so start it about two hours before you are ready to grill.

An elegant presentation but easy to prepare even in the dead of winter…A perfectly roasted chicken, tender and juicy, with crispy skin makes a wonderful Sunday dinner when accompanied with roasted garlic mashed potatoes and a green vegetable or tossed salad.

Roast Chicken

This thick and hearty stew from Durango, one of the northern states, is another Mexican dish that closely resembles chili con carne. A very similar recipe, carne guisada, is given by Jim Peyton in his book, El Norte: The Cuisine of Northern Mexico. We use pork in our version, but beef (or even shredded beef) can be used.

(Pot of Vegetable Stew with Chiltepins)

Like most stews, this one takes a while to cook, about 4 hours. It is interesting because it contains a number of pre-Columbian ingredients, namely Chiltepins, corn, squash, potatoes, and tepary beans. The spicy heat can be adjusted by adding or subtracting Chiltepins.

Unlike bacon that comes from the pork belly, Canadian bacon (also called back bacon or Irish bacon) is made with trimmed pork loins or tenderloins. It is traditionally wet-cured by injecting the meat with a curing solution. In England this bacon includes the fat portion of the loin. Read more about making bacon in Mike Stines' article here.

These butterflied, basted and grilled prawns are a sizzling sensation from South Africa.  Serve with rice and a Green Mango Salad, and make sure there are plenty of lime wedges.
This recipe is the Caribbean answer to Buffalo wings. Although it calls for the chicken to be grilled, the drumsticks can also be broiled, baked, or even deep-fried before being dipped in the sauce.
 

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