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Meal/Course - Main Course
There are many ingredients in this recipe. Please read the entire recipe before you start.

"Holy" basil is widely available in Thai stores. The stems are purple and the leaves are pointed, distinguishing it from regular sweet basil. I actually prefer the flavor to "regular" basil—it’s slightly more bitter and fragrant, with a unique aroma. The basil doesn’t require much cooking, as too much heat makes it bitter and destroys the delicate flavor.

Thanks to Patrick Hancock, executive chef at El Pinto Restaurant for the concept for the sauce recipe. For the chicken, I used The Old Spice Shack’s Country French Rub, and it was delicious. Note that the sauce can be pureed or not, and that it is the most brilliant purple color that you will ever see.

Andouille (On-do-ee) is a sausage very popular here in Louisiana. The lean pork is not ground but cubed. Garlic, onion, herbs and spices are then added and it is stuffed into a larger-diameter casing than most sausages. It is then heavily smoked. I find that the heavy smoking makes the casing a little too al dente so I just peel the casing off before cutting it up to add to the gumbo. Tasso is made of lean thin slices of various cuts of raw pork roast. The slices are then well seasoned with a rub or shake and smoked through. It is great for seasoning beans, greens, soups and gumbos and for the cook’s privilege of sneaking a bite or two while preparing a dish. Serve over steamed white rice with crusty French garlic bread for dipping and a side salad. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

Chicos are dried roasted corn kernels and are also the name of a very popular dish in Northern New Mexico. Traditionally, the corn is dried in the hornos or Indian ovens, which gives it a smoky taste. Today, however, most of the chicos are dried in commercial ovens and lack the distinctive taste.

Yakatori got its name from the Japanese words—yaki for grilled and tori for chicken. I have already taken some liberties with traditional recipes in making this spicy version, so if you would prefer, it can also be made with pork. Plain white rice and a crisp cucumber salad is all that is need to complete a light and tasty meal.
This recipe and others can be found in the following article:
 
Margaret Campos, who owns an organic chile farm and the Comida de Campos cooking school in Embudo, New Mexico, provided this recipe. Since the native chiles in northern New Mexico vary from one micro-region to the next, Campos says to use whatever you have on hand. She serves this green chile stew alone or with beans and a fresh tortilla.
The chutney is a nice and spicy accompaniment to the creamy taste of the scallops. We love habanero chiles in it, but use a serrano for less heat and a slightly different flavor. If you don’t have fresh coconut, substitute 1 ½ cups flaked coconut. Serve with lemon rice pilaf and grilled mango slices.
All fresh green New Mexican chiles are great for stuffing, but we prefer Big Jims because they are so large. Fresh poblano chiles (a Mexican favorite) and even large jalapeños can also be used. Top the rellenos with either a red or green chile sauce before serving.
 

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