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Meal/Course - Main Course

Translated as (Fruit-Stuffed Poblanos With Roasted Tomato Salsa)

Here is another variation on stuffed chiles, this one courtesy of Zarela Martinez, formerly of Zarelas Restaurant in New York City, who says that her version is based on the classic recipe served on national holidays in Mexico. She, however, bakes the chiles instead of deep-frying them. No matter—Zarela says the dish was “one of our most beloved at Zarela.” From the article "Perfectly Pungent Peaches" by Dave DeWitt here.

Chiles rellenos literally means "stuffed chiles," and in Mexico many different chiles are used, including poblanos, jalapeños, rocotos, and even fresh pasillas. Here in the Southwest, we prefer New Mexican green chiles. Whatever type of chile you use, the preparation and fillings are the same.
Chili historian Everett Lee DeGolyer was the owner of The Saturday Review of Literature, and was also, according to H. Allen Smith, "a world traveler, a gourmet, and the Solomon of the chili bowl." Here is the historian's recipe in his own words.
From the famous iconoclast and author of The Great Chili Confrontation, here's the recipe that infuriated Texans after it was published in Holiday Magazine in 1967. Smith had the gall to title his article "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do." Once again, the directions are in Smith's own words.
There are as many versions of chorizo in Mexico and the Southwest as there are of enchiladas. Essentially, it is a hot and spicy sausage that is served with eggs for breakfast, as a filling for tostados or tacos, or mixed with refried beans. This Sonoran version is spicier than most, and, in addition, it is served crumbled rather than being formed into patties.
Here, as best I could reconstruct it, is the chile encrusted pork loin as served at De La Tierra. It is served with a "Barbecue Demi Glace" but they forgot to give me the recipe. So just make a gravy with the pan drippings and add some sherry and a little of your favorite barbecue sauce. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.

From the little village of Chimayó, New Mexico comes what many chileheads consider to be the finest tasting red chile. We use it in our enchilada sauces and for making rubs such as this one. The smoky taste of the chipotle potatoes is a nice complement to the grilled steak. Serve the steak and potatoes with mixed green and yellow snap beans and jalapeño cornbread.

Pasta is not only used by the Italians--remember that Marco Polo visited China and pasta was a favorite in China when he showed up. Since noodles are associated with a long and happy life they are always served at special occasions such as birthdays and New Year’s. These noodles can be served as an appetizer as well as with meats or roasts and the orange oil can be used in a variety of ways such as replacing unflavored oil in stir-frying.
Hot and slightly sweet describes this recipe.  Serve it with plain white rice. Eating the red chile pod pieces is not recommended.
Even though this dish requires marinating overnight, the rest of the preparation is easy. It makes a spicy, fast meal, and you can fry it up and serve it at breakfast with eggs. Or, scramble some eggs, mix in the cooked chorizo, add shredded pepper jack cheese, and wrap in a tortilla for the best breakfast burrito you have ever tasted. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
 

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