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Difficulty - Moderate
My youngest daughter recently visited Tibet and Nepal. She came back with this recipe that I’ve modified a bit. Traditionally, Sukuti is prepared with a dried meat, almost like a jerky. This recipe could also be prepared with beef or buffalo although beef is never eaten in Nepal. This recipe requires advanced preparation to allow the meat to marinate.

This is the staff of life for all classes of Afghans, whether city dwellers or nomads. The basic ingredient is wheat—red hard winter wheat is preferred, but any local wheat will do.

From Arequipa, Peru, one of the hottest (chile-wise) cities in Latin 
America, comes this unusual, delicious sauce that is traditionally
served over boiled and sliced potatoes that are garnished with lettuce,
olives, and hardboiled egg slices. Try it over fried fish as well.

From Sierra Leone, here is one of the more unusual hot sauces I
encountered. Besides palm oil, it is characterized by greens such as
cassava and sweet potato leaves; spinach makes an adequate substitute.
Some versions of this dish are more of a stew than a sauce, but this one
is designed to be served over rice. Warning: Palm oil is high in
saturated fat.

This recipe by Mark Masker appears on the Burn! Blog here. The sausage recipe for this is one I found in Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing.

I tweaked their version a little bit with the habanero peppers. It’s the first thing I made in my grinder, and everyone agreed it was the best chorizo they’d ever tasted.

Chicken is not an everyday dish in Afghanistan, as few are raised, and they are only served at very special meals. Parts can be used, or an entire chicken.

Here is my version of the classic hot sauce of Rórigues Island in the 
Mascarenes. It is very thick, so feel free to thin with more water if
you want. You’d think that this sauce might be sour, but it’s not–the
sugar in the red chiles seems to temper the tart lemons. Any fresh red
chiles can be used, and you can adjust the heat level to your liking.
The yield is high here, but the color is so beautiful that you should
put the excess in decorative bottles as gifts for your friends. It will
keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. Serve it over fish or other
seafood.
The chiles, tomatoes, and squash seeds make this a very New World dish, 
as squash has been a staple of the Mexican diet since it was
domesticated millennia ago. Typically, cooked chicken or turkey is added
to this sauce from southern Mexico.

There are many versions of this dish, which has its origins in the Middle East. Increase the cayenne amount to ½ teaspoon for a more fiery dish. Fresh pomegranate juice gives the sauce a rich, fruity flavor.

 

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